legalfight909

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About legalfight909

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  1. Late to the game, but thanks for the golden nugget!
  2. BackFromTheDebt, My apologies. I'm defiantly no expert and my options are only worth 2 cents, so please take them for what their worth. There is no doubt that there are many members on this forum that are extremely knowledgeable and seasoned veterans on the subject matter. That's why I'm here, and I'm so thankful for the "seasoned veterans of the credit wars", I'm learning a lot. I believe it is of value to me to consider everyones thoughts on the subject matter. Even if they are wrong, I've just learned what not to do. Even a "quack" on the internet throws a few golden nuggets here and there, and I have found many nuggets this way. I would never consider anyone to have all the answers. "We are all ignorant, just in different areas."
  3. Thanks for your reply Robby8900. I'm definitely going do more research and look into this much more extensively.
  4. Clydesmom, Thank you. You are correct. Im just trying to think outside the box and want to glean everything I can. The challenge for me is sorting through all the good information and mis-information. I know that in CA, the Secretary of States office requires law firms to have a surety bond filed with them in order to conduct business in California. http://www.calgold.ca.gov/Results.aspx?location=432&businessTypes=123&greenBusiness=False Since some attorneys and their law firms are not always on the up and up, I suppose one could FOIA request the law firm's bond information from the Secretary of State's office and the attorneys oath of office from the State Bar association. As you may know, not all attorneys are model citizens and someone has to keep them accountable. https://www.courts.ca.gov/25857.htm Believe it or not, JDB and their legal representation do not always play by the rules. I guess what I'm saying is that if you present yourself as low hanging fruit, your chances of being picked are much greater. https://www.consumerfinance.gov/about-us/newsroom/cfpb-takes-action-against-the-two-largest-debt-buyers-for-using-deceptive-tactics-to-collect-bad-debts/
  5. What about representing yourself "Pro per" in a collection lawsuit? Anyone have experience, suggestions or advice about that? I've heard of people picking apart the summons for defects and challenging jurisdiction. Just trying to think outside the box.
  6. Duly noted. Thanks for everyones input. I'm here to learn and take correction.
  7. For those savy enough, there are other legitimate legal way to beat the JDB at their own game. Hint, the burden of proof is on them. Seek (harder) and ye shall find... I would send a FOIA request "Certified Mail" with "return receipt" to their custodian of records demanding ... - Proof they are licensed to collect in my state. - Evidence that they are licensed to conduct interstate commerce. - Their surety bond to see who will indemnify me if I am damaged. - Proof they have a contract with me making me the surety for their claims. FOIA Improvement Act of 2016 (Public Law No. 114-185 Found a couple of videos of a fella named "Corey P Smith" on youtube that has some very interesting information and definitely worth checking out. I hope it helps someone out there.
  8. For those savy enough, there are other legitimate legal ways to beat the JDB at their own game. Hint, the burden of proof is on them. Seek and ye shall find...