GH0104

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About GH0104

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    Impressive 100+ postings

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    New Jersey
  1. Great news! Although it's dismissed without prejudice, hopefully they'll move on to easier nuts to crack and leave you alone.
  2. At least you admit you're a troll - and what was I arguing? I only made statements. I figure that, since you've obviously come here to amuse yourself by acting like a troll, posting nonesensical threads like this one, I might as well glean a bit of amusement myself. It's all right, though. I'm done, too. You may sit here in your pathetic thread, all by your lonesome! (following ChuckyGee out the door)
  3. That literally made me LOL! Then again, I probably would have went with or :'>, whichever is greater...might a simpler equation for some to follow.
  4. You can try here: The Supreme Court of Texas - Texas Rules of Civil Procedure
  5. I would research the specific court in which your case is filed. Many have self-help resources for those who wish to represent themselves.
  6. That is how YOU interpet it. Others have disagreed, and provided excellent alternative interpretations. Furthermore, a judge is far more likely agree with the others before he agrees with you. Liguistics has nothing to do with COMMON SENSE.
  7. Yes, from what I see here, that it correct. Just be sure the rule applies specifically to the court in which the judgment was filed. I only say that because NJ has different levels of civil court, and different RCP's apply to them -- of course, VA is probably not as screwed up as NJ! Anyhow, I digress... You may challenge domestication of judgment on grounds of improper service, should they bother attempting such action. You may also have open a jurisdictional question if you were not resident of VA when suit was filed that could be brought up in the Opposition to Domestication motion. If you were still in VA, there is the service issue you can raise. If you were not in VA when the suits were intiated, VA did not hold personal jurisdiction. You can raise that in the Domestication phase and could well win on that point. Just be sure you have good evidence that the service was flawed and/or that you could not be aware of the suit when it was adjudicated -- in other words, solid proof you resided elsewhere when the alleged service took place. Then, as Nascar pointed out, the judgment creditor could likely be stuck with a judgment that they cannot enforce.
  8. Honestly have no idea how these could have played out... But I agree -- would love to here how it went yesterday!
  9. One requires 15 posts, if my memory serves me correctly.