Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'loan'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Announcements
    • Polls
    • PLEASE READ BEFORE POSTING / Board Announcements
    • Resources
  • Credit Repair Forums
    • Credit Repair
    • Collections
    • Credit Bureaus/Reports/Scores
    • Credit Article of the Week
  • Legal Issues
    • Is There a Lawyer in the House
    • Bankruptcy Q and A
  • Debt Validation
    • While You are In It Debt Validation Q and A
    • Debt Settlement
  • Loans and Banking
    • Obtaining Credit Cards, Auto Loans and Financing
    • Mortgages
    • Student Loans
    • Banking and Finance
  • Non Credit
    • Off Topic
    • Wine

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Location


Biography


Interests


Occupation

Found 6 results

  1. Hello, I was late on my car loan payments and when I finally was able to pay it I was told that it was in the collections dept at Ford. I contacted them and I am still currently making monthly payments directly to the collections dept. However, can the still take my car even though I am paying every month being that it is technically in collections? Also, What if I stop paying will they repo the car or does it just stay on my credit as a collection? I currently live in another state from where I purchased the car. Just trying to know all the options, legalities, and recourse... Thanks
  2. Hi there, I've taken out a loan to attend a private university in the US a few years back. This school has a cooperation with a private, US-based, lending institution to enable prospective international students that cannot find any other forms of financing to take out a loan. In case of the student not being able to make payments and going into default the university is then liable to pay as it basically functions as co-signer. I've been making my payments for the last several years, but now I am encountering financial difficulties that will likely force me to go into default on the loan. That would then mean the university would have to pay the remainder of the loan. As my situation does not look likely to improve over the next few years a deferment may not be an option, so it will likely result in the private university having to cough up the money. Borrowing money from another source is not an option for me as I have no assets to use as collateral. I own a 2nd hand car, re-possessing that would yield less value than going through the whole (int'l) paperwork to get a title to re-possess it in the first place. I do not own any real estate or have any wealthy family, I come from a fairly humble background by US standards. I am NOT living & working in the US and am NOT a US citizen. The loan is NOT a federal student loan and the amount outstanding is less than $100k. What are my options? Can the university get a title against me and possibly re-sell that to an international collections agency? Does it depend on bi-lateral relations? Could it affect me in any way if I were to move to the US at some point in the future? Could I declare chapter 7 bankruptcy in the US? Any other suggestions, possibilities and/or consequences? So far it's not come to this and I'm merely conducting exploratory research. I think the fact that I've actually paid for a few years shows that I'm not trying to run from my responsibilities or get an education on someone else's dime. Hope you can understand that I will not mention the name of the university or the lending institution. Thanks in advance for any and all help & suggestions. xyz12345
  3. I recently filed chapter 13 as a way to save my home from foreclosure. There are 10 payments that were made (before bankruptcy was filed) that the mortgage company never applied to my account. I keep asking (and emailing) my bankruptcy attorney about it but have yet to receive a response. To top it off, my loan was just switched to a new servicer. What can I do or who do I need to talk to to get my account credited for these payments? If a "lender" has provided incorrect balance, fee and/or charge information to the BK court, shouldn't my BK attorney be looking at challenging these errors?
  4. Hey all. I'm in a bit of a predicament. Let me start from the beginning: My daughter was born last February with an extremely rare skin condition. My mother agreed to help out by taking over my card payments. She didn't and waited until they threatened legal action to tell me. I called them and got the legal action dropped. Lesson learned, but now what? My credit rating is in shambles and I'm going to have to pay a ridiculous monthly payment to get back on track. My balance is almost $3,000 at this point and with a little one with a rare medical condition, I can't afford those kind of payments. So my question is: what's my best course of action that won't cost me an arm and a leg? Personal loan? Balance transfer to another card? I'm sure it'd be difficult to get either at this point, let alone anything that's not going to kill me with interest and fees. I can afford the typical monthly payments, but what they want me to pay now is going to be very, very difficult. I'd love to just nix the card I'm on at this point and start over, honestly. Thanks for your help.
  5. Ok so I have a very confusing situation that I hope someone will be able to help me solve or at least point me in the right direction. Sorry for the long post! I took out a school loan from a University I attended in Spring of 2011, the loan was to be repaid from my federal student loan for summer courses I was taking. My loan came in and was credited to my account ( it said I owed nothing and was actually due a refund). When my grades for the Spring semester came in they did not meet the schools academic standards and I was dismissed. The only redeeming thing I could think of from that experience was that I had a bill in my hand from the school for $0.00. Fast forward eight months later, I get a bill from the school for the Spring 2011 loan that I believed and had documentation was paid off. Turns out the school said I was not eligible for the loan because of my Spring grades ( which do not come in until two weeks into the Summer Semester). I called and tried to talk to the school, which had added on a late fee before they even sent me notice of the bill. I have argued with them for years because they say they were supposed to return the entire loan and I have researched school loan policies and the school's policies and have found nothing. I have even talked to an attorney who has sent two letters offering to settle the matter for the original amount ( not the massive late fees they've added to the bill) which they have not answered. They have reported the debt to a debt collector that has in my opinion reported the matter in a fraudulent way. So I am disputing it as paid in full. What chance do I have at getting this removed from my reports? Didn't accord and satisfaction happen when it was paid? Experian said it was just an intermediary in the dispute process, which really isn't true because the debt collector can put their information up, but I get a small sentence saying I dispute the bill, I don't get to show where the bill has been paid. Anyway I know this is a long post, but hopefully someone has some advice for me! Thanks in advance!
  6. stk

    Mortgage advice for 2013

    Here are 10 mortgage tips to help you with your mortgage decisions in 2013: 1. Stop procrastinating and refinance. If you haven't refinanced recently, you're probably paying a higher interest rate on your mortgage than you should. Take advantage of today's record-low mortgage rates while they last. 2. Buyers, get moving. With rates near the bottom and home prices on the rise, it's still a perfect time to buy a house. Get a mortgage preapproval before you start shopping. 3. Compare FHA vs. conventional loans. Many homebuyers opt for aFederal Housing Administration mortgage because it allows them to buy a home with as little as 3.5 percent down. But the already costly FHA fees that are added to your loan will increase again in 2013. Consider saving a little extra for a down payment on a conventional loan. 4. Ensure that your credit is golden. Credit standards remain tight. As new mortgage rules are unveiled in 2013, the standards are not expected to loosen. If you plan to get a mortgage anytime soon, you must treat your credit as one of your most valuable assets. You'll need a credit score of at least 720 to get the best rate. Borrowers with a credit score of 680 or more can still get a good deal. Review your credit report before you apply for a mortgage. Sometimes, paying part of your credit card balances can boost your credit score quickly. 5. Want to pay off your mortgage earlier? If you are one of those homeowners who dream about being mortgage-free, the low-rate environment may be a good opportunity to refinance your 30-year mortgage into a 15- or 20-year loan. Make sure you can afford the higher payments on the shorter loan and that you have money saved for emergencies. 6. Underwater refinancers: Don't take "no" for an answer. If you owe more than your home is worth and have tried and failed to refinance, give it another shot in 2013. The Home Affordable Refinance Program, or HARP 2.0, was revamped to allow homeowners to refinance regardless of how deeply underwater they are. Lenders are much more open to HARP 2.0 refinances these days than they were a few months ago. If one lender says you don't qualify for a HARP refi, don't take "no" for an answer. Try to find a lender willing to do it. 7. Give your lender a chance. If you have trouble paying your mortgage, don't ignore your mortgage servicer. There are new programs available for borrowers who struggle to keep up with mortgage payments, including forbearance for those with FHA mortgages. Lenders have been more willing to work out delinquent loans through loan modifications and even short sales for homeowners who can't afford to stay in their homes. 8. Shop for a low rate and good service. Even with rates hovering near record lows, you should still shop for the best mortgage deal. Get quotes from at least three lenders and compare not just the interest rate but also closing costs and the quality of their service. Favor lenders that have a reputation of closing on time. 9. Approved for a mortgage? Leave your credit alone. Most lenders order a second credit report for the borrower a few days before closing. Don't open new accounts or charge up your credit cards at the furniture store while you wait for closing day. 10. It's not over until the loan closes. You've submitted your mortgage application and locked a rate. The race has just begun. Submit any documents requested by your loan officer or mortgage broker within 24 hours, if possible. Lenders will remain overwhelmed with the large volume of refinance applications at least through the first few months of 2013. Follow up with your lender or mortgage broker at least once a week to ensure the process goes smoothly. Mortgages Tips and Informations