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Found 4 results

  1. I received a summons and complaint for a credit card. The plaintiff is the creditor from Colorado and their attorney is out of Denver. They stated the venue is Weld County because I live there and the payments were to be made in Weld county. I have never lived in Weld county and the payments were never to be made in Weld county. How big of deal is this and should I deny the venue in my answer?
  2. Government shutdown didn't end without repercussions Article courtesy of "Credit Card Builders" Premium Newsletter. The government shutdown has ended – at least for the moment. But the first shutdown since 1995 did take a toll on the country. Of course, the shutdown occurred because House Republicans were insistent that new spending bills include language that damaged or eliminated Obamacare; while Democrats were just as insistent it remained intact. Most people only think about the billions of dollars that were lost, such as the estimated $24 billion in lost economic output; and $450,000 per day in revenues lost at National Parks. But there were other things that went basically unseen. For example, the job reports didn’t come out on time due to delays caused as a direct result of the shutdown. Additionally, the folks who usually inspect eggs and fresh berries (and just about anything else you could put on a plate outside of red meat) were on furlough. Additionally, the FDA skipped untold numbers of inspections at dairies, processing plants and other food companies; what’s more, the FDA couldn’t do many follow-up inspections to ensure problems they’d already found were fixed. Why? Nearly 1,000 of their 1,602 inspectors were furloughed! Worse yet, the federal Center for Disease Control and Prevention (located in Georgia) sent 9,000 of their 13,000 workers home, which meant they couldn’t give their best effort to curbing the salmonella outbreak in chicken that reached 18 states. That’s bad enough – but that’s just one area that suffered. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission wasn’t running, so discrimination cases weren’t making it into court. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration wasn’t doing business, so untrained employees could operate dangerous equipment. Children and adults wishing to use government sites such as NASA or the Census Bureau discovered these sites were not available due to the shutdown. Doctors could not apply for federal funded research grants to find cures for diseases, which may set their research back by as much as a year. Even the FCC was closed, so our country’s citizens couldn’t call to complain about a radio, television or Internet broadcast that offended them. But just because the shutdown has ended, don’t forget that this is just a temporary fix. The 16-day shutdown ended with a deal that raises the debt ceiling and allows current spending levels to remain the same through January 15, 2014. However, with Republicans saying they’ll “do anything” to derail the health care laws put in place by President Obama, there may be another one just around the corner.
  3. I lost a judgement to Discover about two years ago for around $4,000 plus attorney fees, and nothing has ever come of it. I think I got one letter after the summary judgement asking to contact them to negotiate, and once last year saying you can use your tax refunds to negotiate a payment, and that's been it. No other contact. In the meantime, I've basically kept my bank account as low as possible, only putting money in to pay electronic transfers on my car insurance and stuff. I've been recently saving money though, and am collecting a nice pile of paychecks that I have yet to deposit or cash for fear that at some point they could place a levy on my bank account and take it. I've also been sued by a junk debt buyer in the meantime over a different debt, and have seriously been considering declaring bankruptcy. My question is, is there any safe alternatives for me to keep my money safe from levies besides storing cash? Which also isn't safe, since someone could rob me and I would be out of everything. I'm not sure the exact method in which someone who wins a judgment gets a levy. Do they just ask a bank if someone with my name has a bank account with them, the bank gives them the info, and then they place a levy on the account? I've heard of prepaid debit cards as a good alternative, but couldn't they do the same exact thing with one of these as well? I've read the only state in the US where bank levies are illegal is Delaware, so I wonder if I could safely open an out of state account and deposit money there. If anyone has any advice, it would be appreciated. I've been pretty much tortured and anxious over all this lately ('ve been up all night actually), because I'm finally starting to turn things around and save some money, but feel like I'm trapped because of this judgment and don't want to lose my entire savings from work. Thanks for the help.
  4. Here are 10 mortgage tips to help you with your mortgage decisions in 2013: 1. Stop procrastinating and refinance. If you haven't refinanced recently, you're probably paying a higher interest rate on your mortgage than you should. Take advantage of today's record-low mortgage rates while they last. 2. Buyers, get moving. With rates near the bottom and home prices on the rise, it's still a perfect time to buy a house. Get a mortgage preapproval before you start shopping. 3. Compare FHA vs. conventional loans. Many homebuyers opt for aFederal Housing Administration mortgage because it allows them to buy a home with as little as 3.5 percent down. But the already costly FHA fees that are added to your loan will increase again in 2013. Consider saving a little extra for a down payment on a conventional loan. 4. Ensure that your credit is golden. Credit standards remain tight. As new mortgage rules are unveiled in 2013, the standards are not expected to loosen. If you plan to get a mortgage anytime soon, you must treat your credit as one of your most valuable assets. You'll need a credit score of at least 720 to get the best rate. Borrowers with a credit score of 680 or more can still get a good deal. Review your credit report before you apply for a mortgage. Sometimes, paying part of your credit card balances can boost your credit score quickly. 5. Want to pay off your mortgage earlier? If you are one of those homeowners who dream about being mortgage-free, the low-rate environment may be a good opportunity to refinance your 30-year mortgage into a 15- or 20-year loan. Make sure you can afford the higher payments on the shorter loan and that you have money saved for emergencies. 6. Underwater refinancers: Don't take "no" for an answer. If you owe more than your home is worth and have tried and failed to refinance, give it another shot in 2013. The Home Affordable Refinance Program, or HARP 2.0, was revamped to allow homeowners to refinance regardless of how deeply underwater they are. Lenders are much more open to HARP 2.0 refinances these days than they were a few months ago. If one lender says you don't qualify for a HARP refi, don't take "no" for an answer. Try to find a lender willing to do it. 7. Give your lender a chance. If you have trouble paying your mortgage, don't ignore your mortgage servicer. There are new programs available for borrowers who struggle to keep up with mortgage payments, including forbearance for those with FHA mortgages. Lenders have been more willing to work out delinquent loans through loan modifications and even short sales for homeowners who can't afford to stay in their homes. 8. Shop for a low rate and good service. Even with rates hovering near record lows, you should still shop for the best mortgage deal. Get quotes from at least three lenders and compare not just the interest rate but also closing costs and the quality of their service. Favor lenders that have a reputation of closing on time. 9. Approved for a mortgage? Leave your credit alone. Most lenders order a second credit report for the borrower a few days before closing. Don't open new accounts or charge up your credit cards at the furniture store while you wait for closing day. 10. It's not over until the loan closes. You've submitted your mortgage application and locked a rate. The race has just begun. Submit any documents requested by your loan officer or mortgage broker within 24 hours, if possible. Lenders will remain overwhelmed with the large volume of refinance applications at least through the first few months of 2013. Follow up with your lender or mortgage broker at least once a week to ensure the process goes smoothly. Mortgages Tips and Informations