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I understand according to the FCRA that an item will stay on your account for 7 years. Basically, it has its "commencement", when the first payment is missed. 180 days after that the 7 year period will begin to run. I asked Equifax why my account is showing a date of last deliquency of 02 of 2003 when the account first deliquency should be in 1998? I have sent off a Validation request to the OC specifically requesting this DOLD as well. Equifax told me that they can report it deliquent every month if they wanted. That I would have to contact the OC for the DOLD to have it removed when the 7 year period was up? I thought that this would constitute the re-aging of a debt? I mean If a consumer does'nt know to contact the OC then they just continue to have this on their credit. I read Brinckerhoff-Gillespie opinion letter from the FTC and think that I am right on the right track here...or am I?

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On your EQ report, you will look at the date noted as "Date of Last Activity". It will be removed 7 years from that date on negative items. BTW, none of my EQ's have the notation you mention. An OC does not have to validate and yes, they can report delinquency each month until charge off. Then, the account will show charge off including the lates, and most will remain that way until sold or transferred with a R9. At that time the account will be changed to read "Account transferred or sold", rating changed to a R5, with a -0- balance.

So, you say it went delinquent in 1998. Was that the last time you made a payment? Or, were you just late making the payment? And, from 1998 to today, were you late other times?

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