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Is this tactic allowed?!


Anonymous
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:eek:

Not too long ago, I made an error in my checking account calculations, and I bounced a check. I was in the process of setting up payments directly with the creditor. I had received a notice from a collection agency, but I wanted to deal with the merchant directly. Then, low & behold, I had to go to my bank, because I had gotten a notice that I had two additional NSFs! When I got the print out of my account, there on the account were two drafts from the collection agency! One was for the amount of the original check I'd bounced. The second was for the fee! This caused me two NSF charges on my account. I had *NEVER* given them permission to deduct anything from my account. About a week later I received a letter from them telling me they would be deducting these from my account. This was after the fact, of course. They never bothered to ask my permission, and I certainly never gave them permission to do so. Is this tactic allowed?!

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I believe it is....if you bounce a check, the bank is going to deduct it. You need to find out if the collection agency is a division of the bank. If it is, then it is legal, because it is the original creditor. If not, you have a case against them.

Boy these guys are getting sneaky!

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:(

No. This collection agency was a seperate entity from the bank. The two are not even located in the same city (much less county) in my state. From what I can guess, when the collection agency received a copy of the bounced check from the creditor, they simply used the numbers at the bottom of the check to deduct from my banking account. Also, I still can't believe that, instead of just sending one, they sent two seperate ones. What was the point of that?

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