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Disputing as "not mine"...what is the worst that c


rookiegirl77
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Okay, I read all the posts that state to go to the CRAs and say the account is "not mine". Okay, what is the worst that can happen if you do this? If someone has a paid off derogatory account and it is disputed as "not mine", but it is what is the worst thing they will do? Also what if it is deleted (best case scenerio) and they (worst case) they see that it was indeed yours, will they CRA put it back on the account.

I'm desperate to clean up my credit because I want to buy a car next year and lock my condo into a locked rate, but know I can't right now with four charge-offs on my account. Currently 1 is paid, 2 should be paid soon, and the final I am going to offer a settlement early next year after taxes come back and bonuses are received, etc.

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I'd be cautious about doig this were I you.

To say in writing (using federal law as a hammer to back you up) that an account isn't your accout when you know it is your account I believe is called criminal fraud. Now, whether or not any of the bureaus, etc care enough to actually go after an individual consumer for doing so I don't know.

However, there is usually enough incorrect data in reporting that you can find legitimate reasons to dispute without the need to lie and that's how I would suggest you approach it.

Also, you may want to post your question in the area here that deals more specifically with the bureaus.

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It isn't a criminal act to state in writing an account is not yours when in fact it is. If anything it would be a civil tort. Creditors and credit bureaus know many if not the vast majority of contests are ficticious claims and it's factored into the business model. You can also lie in civil court with little repurcussion, however it is a criminal act to lie in bankruptcy court!

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Disputing an account as not mine isn't necessary.

You just say I don't recognize this, then the CRA reps interprete this as " not my account." The CRAs are then making the error since their dispute process is so simplified.

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If you say that an account is "not mine" or "unrecognized," The CRA standard response is to take your claim as identity fraud. The problem with that is that the CRAs simply refuse to admit that mistakes happen. If it isn't yours it must be IDFraud in their empty little skulls...never mind it may just be a data entry error or some other type of fraud (such as corporate extortion).

Illinois passed a new law that goes into effect Jan 1 that makes it easier for consumers to dispute to the CRAs on basis of simple clerical errors. You can claim that something isn't yours without having to file a police report and the CRAs must honor it. Hopefully, other States will recognize the problem and follow up with their own version of this law.

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It's NOT 'criminal fraud.'

Sheesh....

But it MAY be counterproductive.

You could end up with a ID Theft alert on your file, which could FREEZE it.

OR they may just verify it's yours anyways and update the date on it, thereby making it even more recent....

I've heard MANY different opinions on this...I wouldn't personally do it...

Much easier to attack something incorrect IN the tradeline.

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Methuss said

The CRA standard response is to take your claim as identity fraud.

Perhaps your are right.

However, In my experience, I never disputed any items as "Not mine." I acted helpless and merely said I don't recognize this- what is this? The CRA reps were then off and running and 9 out of 12 items were gone in 30 days or less.

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I just disputed as not mine all derogs not reporting in over a year on my and DW's reports. 33% dropped off.

Now when I look at it, it was the OC entries that dropped off. The others remain. Asset, AFNI Midland and CBCN. Damn!

As I said in a few post above, almost anyting will work in the short-term but long-term is another matter.

A legitimate debt (and whether the consumer think's it's legitimate is not the issue), especially in today's computer heavy society, is VERY likely to show up again and again over a span of years. Only a significant period of time and/or the creditor finally giving up will make it disappear from bureau reports. Even a debt fully discharged in bankruptcy - even paying it off in full (even for a PFD) is not an iron-clad guarantee that its history, accurate or not, won't show up again on a future report.

I suppose what I'm trying to say here is that while consumers have tools to work with, in striving for the perfectly clean cedit report, winning a battle and winning the war are, as always, two different things.

The truly scarry part about this is not just a lower FICO score...it's that even for those who have decided to live without debt/credit, the impact of our credit reports touch so many things today including whether we get hired for a job or can get the best rates on insurance.

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I'm not discussing the whether "not mine" is morally or even legally correct. Just reporting what I did and what the result was.

I made no comment on whether your actions were moral or legal nor was that the point of my post. xcoffx

What I was trying to point out is that derogatory information, both accurate and inaccurate, will likely keep coming back again and again even if one is successful in getting it deleated again and agaig. And further pointing out how much of a problem that can cause today with the way "credit reports" are used for all sorts of reasons not even associated with the granting of credit.

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