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Where can I get a Tax Attorney for an IRS Audit


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What you should look for is an accounting firm that has what are known as "registered agents" in-house. These are people who are authorized by the Treasury department to act on your behalf in tax matters.

Probable worst case scenario if you can't produce the receipts is your return gets adjusted and they may add interest on top of the new amount owed.

Absolute worst case scenario is if you really overstated the amounts or used one of the tax-dodge promoter's plans and it looks like willful fraud as opposed to simple negligence. Those kinds of things wind up with possible criminal charges on top of fines.

It's not a root-canal if you're calm and well organized. But it aint fun.

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Thank you for your honesty. Actually I was sent to this location by someone I knew who had their taxes done there. I just found out that it seems anybody who had their taxes done by this company and their family members are being audited. There was no fraud on my part. The tax preparer asked me a series of questions while doing the forms but that was all. Of course we have been trying to contact the tax preparers with negative results. This is just awful.

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It's not registered agents - it's enrolled agents. An enrolled agent is someone who is enrolled to practice before the IRS and is more specialized in taxation than an attorney or cpa. (I just took my test. PM me, I'll give you some advice if you need it.) I have had only a few dealings with Chicago's finest. Those dealings I have had were quite impressive. All in all, a very gracious, professional group of people. However, I assume that you are all slightly less gracious when it comes to drug dealers, terrorists, and other law breaking, villanous, miscreant oozing scum.

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If you haven't done anything and you walk into an IRS audit with an attorney then it WILL be a root-canal! Probably worse as you won't have the benefit of anesthesia. If someone else has prepared your return just be prepared to explain actions. You will not absolutely need receipts at the audit. I've been through IRS inquiries and audits routinely and never once was the result adverse. There are nice people who work for the IRS as well as some real boneheads who will flat-out threaten to bust your chops if you walk in with an attorney! If you have in fact cheated in a major way --- then YES by all means hire an attorney or enrolled agent! BTW, audits tend to go faster right before lunch and right before the end of the day!

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I am curious as to what your experience with the IRS is, Ghacorp. Most of the unrepresented people I have encountered got screwed without representation. I've had to fix many messes like that. If you're not a practitioner and you've been through IRS audits "routinely", that would make me a little nervous. Furthermore, if any IRS agents make any of the threats you mentioned, there is the Tax Adminsitration Inspector General. I sent one IRS agent to Leavenworth through them.

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Furthermore, if any IRS agents make any of the threats you mentioned, there is the Tax Adminsitration Inspector General. I sent one IRS agent to Leavenworth through them.

88-):shock: Leavenworth??!?! I would have assumed the Inspector General is nothing more than "circling the wagons" around the IRS.

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Not a practitioner, just an entrepreneur who takes an unusually high number of suspecious deductions each year which typically results in the very least, mail audits and information requests. Also, a Chamber of Commerce member, who compares notes with other professionals, etc. How you are treated is up to the individual examiner handling your case and how you react to him or her. If it's a good day, you'll leave with a refund. If it's a bad day, you'll get to write a check. That's pretty much IRS audit 101 in a nutshell!

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Uh-huh. I wouldn't advertise that if I were you. There may be an IRS employee that might know about this site. If I were that employee I would have a field day with you. I push the envelope a little myself, but I always back it up with the code, revenue rulings and case law. I have yet to lose an audit when I've done that. But there are many out there that have your same philosophy that I make a lot of money out of. I guess it all depends on who you want to pay in the end, or maybe I should say, both ends.

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Income taxes are constitutional and one should not pay attention to those websites that say they aren't. Most of those people are in prison or are headed that way. Instead of relying on such websites, I suggest you read the volumes on Taxation in the legal encyclopedia American Jurisprudence, 2d Edtion. Otherwise, you'll be hiring a guy like me take a stab at reducing the time you serve.

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I am filling a return with zero taxes for 99.

In 96 I submitted an extension with a check. Their records show that I have an estimated tax payment. I did not file a return in 96 either.

The representative gave a me a penality formula that included 25% of tax liability (before credits). The formula suggests that even if I don't owe taxes because they were all taken from that years income, I could still owe a penalty on the tax liability and interst on that penalty. It does sound like an unconstitutional idea to me.

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1. Using all caps is bad e-mail etiquette as it is usually construed as yelling.

2. Believe what you want to believe. I just know I make money with that kind of belief.

3. Yes, the IRS screws up a lot. That's because our beloved congress (both parties) make the law too complex.

4. Start electing office seakers who mean what they say by doing what they say in realing in the Infernal Rape Service instead of just talking about it.

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My apologies for yelling, I didnt do it intentionally. Yes 54000 IRS Codes is a tad bit too much for your average "least informed Tax Payer" .

I have been reading some recent "Tax Avoidance" Cases and I am suprised on how the DOJ refuses to answer direct questions regarding where the IRS gets their authority to collect taxes. Those Bums in congress hardly ever represent the people. We the people have no choice we have a 2 party system with 1 party being better than the other.

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Last time Grim checked, the 16th Amendment gives the government the right to tax based upon income.

Prior to that, taxes were based per person. Now when the income tax first came out it was aimed at your Rockefellers and Vanderbilts of the country. Now its this monstrosity of a social engineering and wealth redistribution system.

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Someone has proved the 16th amendment was not properly ratified. A guy named Bill Benson. I believe I read somewhere that it isnt "income Tax" even though thats what they call it. Also rumor has it they are going to ditch income tax & have what they call a "Fair Tax" although we know how fair the fair tax will be and we also know about rumors.

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Some added trivia - The original 13th Amendment is missing from most modern printings, but it is, most probably, still in effect. It prohibits lawyers from holding federal office. President Clinton, a lawyer, held office in violation of the Constitution.

I like your trivia but could you copy and paste the text of your proof. Your idea about prohibits laywers may come from:

http://www.usconstitution.net/constamfail.html

The Anti-Title Amendment

This amendment, submitted to the States in the 11th Congress (in 1810), said that any citizen who accepted or received any title of nobility from a foreign power, or who accepted without the consent of Congress any gift from a foreign power, by would no longer be a citizen There is some debate about whether this amendment was actually ratified or not, mostly by those who put forth the fanciful notion that if it had been, most (if not all) legislators who are lawyers, and who use the title "Esquire" would no longer be citizens, and hence, no longer be able to serve in Congress. This amendment is still outstanding. [...] Congressional research shows that the amendment was ratified by twelve states, the last being in 1812.

The text:

If any citizen of the United States shall accept, claim, receive or retain any title of nobility or honour, or shall, without the consent of Congress, accept and retain any present, pension, office or emolument of any kind whatever, from any emperor, king, prince or foreign power, such person shall cease to be a citizen of the United States, and shall be incapable of holding any office of trust or profit under them, or either of them.

---

The missing 13th amendment thing would be hard to paste :)

Text of the 13th amendment - http://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/constitution.amendmentxiii.html

Section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.

Section 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.

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