Jump to content

Identity theft is not really a problem in America.


Radio_Guy
 Share

Recommended Posts

Well relief at last...

Fortunately, we can all rest easy knowing that Javelin Strategy and Research has determined that all those alarmists at the Dept of Justice and the FBI are just being silly.

Identity theft is not really a problem like everyone thinks...

Phew, I feel so much better knowing that some unknown research company, has put the FBI Annual Crime Statistics Bulletin in its place.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20051208/wr_nm/life_identity_theft_dc

Isn't it nice to know that when the FBI says Id Teft is the fastest growing crime and that every 6 seconds there is an ID theft, they are just blowing things out of proportion. Thats only 18,921,600 people per year.

And those silly people at the ABA are obviously no better-

Identity theft is the fastest growing financial crime in America and tops the American Banking Association’s (ABA) list of fraud concerns. Nearly 10 million Americans were victimized last year with losses over $53 billion. One household in four has been affected over the past five years.

That's only 25% of America.

Gee... I wonder who paid for this study?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

In all fairness, a chunk of Identity Theft is bogus...

I have done it and plenty of people here on this board have done it as well... Like, when disputing with EX on the phone and telling them that this particular inquiry is the result of fraud...

And I am sure that there are plenty of variations on that...

But Identity Theft is still very serious... And still very easy...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agreed.. a certain amount of ID theft is not accurate... I know alot of people who have had credit problems say they were a victim of ID theft because they are embarrassed. However that doesn't mean they are filing false ID theft claims. The FBI figures come from police records of filed reports. Most inaccurate claims of ID theft are not included in these numbers.

This study was ordered and paid for by an "undisclosed" industry group right after the Choicepoint scandal.

The point is that the businesses who makes lots of $$$ selling and buying data are scared that we might force our regulators to stop or slow this practice. (Which sometimes includes our SSNs.)

Personally I have gone a year long campaign to clean out my mailbox. I opted out a year ago and have written 21 CMRRR's to different organizations to stop the sale and use of my name and address.

I am aghast the lengths I have to goto to stop the use of my name and personal data every month. I just received a solicitation from an organization for summer camps for my children. I was targeted because I have children. I appreciate the need to advertise however WHY can people find out I have children from a brokered list?

Personally I am concerned about not just ID theft but my privacy and my children's saftey which is tied into this whole mess.

(/off soapbox)

Sorry for venting - I am just tired of being scrutinized by people who do not have my permission to look at my personal information.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A deeper issue is what to do with public information...

The thing about public information, is that, well, its public... If you step into any county courthouse, you can view loads of public information. Some people are like shocked that their information is public even though it is sitting on courthouse records...

Prior to the information age, such concerns were not a big deal. Now with a few clicks here and there, all that information is available...

Then, there are lots of "voluntary" disclosures of private information... People give out a lot of of private information...

I am not defending credit card outfits or other retailers... But, there is already plenty of information ALREADY accessible to them... Without them having to circumvent any laws...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agreed...

And I have no problem with the sale of information that is really public.

But it is not the public information I am concerned about, its the collection of my personal data and buying habits by the CRAs and sale thereof.

(Like the fact that I paid for my chilren's summer camp by my credit card.)

THAT is what I was trying to say.

Best wishes,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Some states have been stepping up to the plate to protect consumer privacy in connection with public records. Some states now require the court houses to black out social security number listings on the case files.

But there is a draw back to that policy, that makes it easier to match up the case files to the wrong consumer and no one likes seeing a judgement on their report just because they shared the same name as the other person.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use to go to the court houses to collect the judgements, I discovered it is always in the consumers best interest to view the court documents and look for incorrect spellings in the name, or wrong address, missing social security numbers and such. Sometimes you can find leverage against the credit reporting agency once you review that judgement.

When collecting a judgement the contracted company is suppose to collect:

Name

Address

Social Security Number

Amount of the judgement plus court cost

Status of the judgement if paid or not

Date filed and date satisfied

The amount of the judgement is loose, sometimes it is going to be judge the amount granted and not include the court cost, some times it is added in. You can always dispute incorrect account.

Plus sometimes the credit reporting agency messes up on the court house name and subscriber number - when I worked for the credit bureau that happened once that all the judgements sent in had the credit bureau listed as the court house. So there is another common mistake to dispute.

Then there is the question if you can void the judgement, if you had been served proper notice or not. I think there is only a years time you can dispute with the court house on this matter, please correct me if I am wrong.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For the period from July 2002 to July 2003 there were about 7 million cases of identity theft in the US. Assuming a 50% growth rate per year that would be 10.5 million for July 2003 to July 2004 and 17.75 million for July 2004 to July 2005 and 26.625 million for the period of July 2005 to July 2006.

With about 170 million adults in the US with credit cards that makes the odds of suffering ID theft this year about 15.66%. And that 170 million includes those with bad credit so if you have good credit the odds are obviously higher.

denknach.gifrotz.gif

Of course we don't know the growth rate of ID theft for the last few years yet but any why you slice it I thinks the numbers are significant.

http://www.idtheftcenter.org/facts.shtml

http://www.nobleworld.biz/images/Ockrim.pdf

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

My DH & I had an incident recently. We own a bookstore and also sell books online through AMAZON. We had a letter come through from Amazon asking us to verify our info, credit card # etc.. At first I thought it was a hoax but the strange thing was that we had just transferred our funds to our business account ant the e-mail mentioned there would be a delay in our funds transferring if we did not verify! Letter also had all the Amazon logos and the initial path did say Amazon so I said, well, maybe it is AMAZON. Boy were we suckered or what. :evil: We verified our cc number, id and everything. After doing it we were like :shock: something just is not right. So we called AMAZON and found out we had just been scammed! :? First thing I did was change password for our amazon account. Then called credit card company and canceled card to get new one. Good thing we reacted quickly or who knows what would have happened. Needless to say we still felt violated! :evil: ID theft if very easy...and I thought I was good at spotting these type of hoaxes :roll: We forwarded phishing letter to AMAZON so they could investigate path where it came from and then DH responded to that hoax e-mail by saying "Better luck next time chumps you will be caught!!! I don't know if that was the smartest thing to do but it made my DH feel better! :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yup. On line Phising is a real problem.

Some thoughts.

Always respond to an issue like account verification by you going to them.

Go to http://www.hoovers.com/free/tools/bcl

To find their phone numbers and web address.

This site has app publicly trades stocks in America and Canada.

http://finance.yahoo.com/lookup

What other inf. did you give them besides your credit card number and amazon account inf.?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yup. On line Phising is a real problem.

Some thoughts.

Always respond to an issue like account verification by you going to them.

Go to http://www.hoovers.com/free/tools/bcl

To find their phone numbers and web address.

This site has app publicly trades stocks in America and Canada.

http://finance.yahoo.com/lookup

What other inf. did you give them besides your credit card number and amazon account inf.?

Alexander: Luckily for us they only asked for Amazon info and cc info. Amazon said sometimes these people will use your account info to list bogus stuff and then get money from buyers and disappear. They did not ask for any banking info or SS#. Thank God!

Dive: Yup I know that now. Wish I knew that earlier. :roll:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.. For more information, please see our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.