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Accept or refuse certified mail?

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My Mother called today (isn't it great when your Mother gets drawn into all this) to inform me someone is trying to deliver a manila envelope/package via certified mail to her address. I have no idea who sent this package, but I have two judgments against me on my CR, and also Hilco (CA) is on there with a couple collections.

What is proper procedure? Sure, I would like to know who it is and what they have to say, but does refusing to sign help protect me in any way?

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They are not officers of the court so you can refuse it... this MAY depend on yoru state...

When you are served with a summons by sherriffs dept.. or a process server thats another animal.

I have done that twice.. also you can find out who it is by asking for the tracking number next time they try to deliver.. call the post office and they can tell you who the sender is.

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Thanks Blue Eyes. I just called up the post office (had to call a branch on the left coast due to the time) and a nice guy looked it up for me. He said, much to his suprise, that there was no address/name/general location of where it was sent from... only information was of today's attempted delivery. Sounds ugly.

What are the pro's/con's of accepting or refusing it? Will the fact that no one signed for it potentially do me good in the future?

I feel like I am really behind the power curve here. It looks easy when you are just talking about validation letters and disputes with the CRAs, but quite scary when you think someone is trying to find you so they can sue you.

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I always figure it is better to know than not know.

Your mother can correctly say you don't live there, and that she does not have your current address.

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Man, I will NEVER forget the fear that certified mail instilled in me! I never accepted them. I wasn't in a position to deal with it, financially or emotionally. I was still having trouble just getting out of bed and getting dressed each day - dealing with that crap just was NOT going to happen until I got back in control of myself.

Anyway, so at one point, I had finally decided it was time to start facing up to my situation, and I started checking the mail again (I mean daily, as opposed to when it overflowed... and I was actually opening envelopes for a change too!). I got a certified mail notice in my mailbox. I called the post office, and they could only tell me it was sent from a California P.O. box, but there was no sender listed.

So, I gathered my strength, got in the car, and drove to the post office that Saturday. The clerk handed me a small manila envelope. I sat in my car staring at it for a few moments, and then opened it.

.

.

.

.

.

.

It was a freakin' "contest" for a time share resort!!!LOL! I swear my heart was racing, and all for a a bogus sweepstakes!

Anyway, I never suffered any consequences that I know of from refusing certified mail, and back then, I didn't have the information to deal with it that I learned here, so if any of them were collectors, it would have likely intimidated me and, and my mess would have been made worse.

That being said, YOU are armed with a lot of valuable information and allies here, so I hope that you'll get great advice here, and not feel helpless like I did.

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Funny ending... it was nothing credit related - sort of like the 'contest' story above.

Makes me want to be a little more preemptive, so I am in control and know where things stand, rather then waiting on things to happen to me. Gives me a fresh outlook today.

Thanks all. It really does help to hear about your experiences.

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What are the pro's/con's of accepting or refusing it? Will the fact that no one signed for it potentially do me good in the future?

In legal matters, refusal of certified mail presumes delivery. In other words, you're presumed to know and have received the contents of the mail. Sometimes, this can work in your favor, such as when a CA's registered agent wrote "refused" and put a big smiley over the envelope with my intent to sue.

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I'll give you the postal side of things...

If you don't live at your mom's address, have her tell the carrier to scan it as "undeliverable as addressed, assuming you don't have an active forward order in. You can also simply not claim it. It will go back to sender after 10 days as "unclaimed."

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