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Disputes- Mail, call or online?


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I just got my credit reports and am ready to start disputing with the CRA's. I wanted to get some opinions on what was the best approach to contact the CRA's. I have heard people say ALWAYS do everything by mail. Some say just call and do it over the phone and others :confused: dispute on line. The GOOD CREDIT IS SEXY program says to always write your letters and do not use form dispute letters. ???? Can I get some feed back from people who have been through this??? Thanks:confused:

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Phone calls and internet are ok for minor issues like name and address errors, and a few simple things like "included in bankruptcy."

But use it for disputing tradelines beyond IIB at your own risk. With phone and internet disputes you have no records of proof that you even contacted the bureau. When you do your disputes by mail (one letter one tradeline) you are creating a verified paper trail that can be used in court if you have to take it that far... and believe me, many people do have to take it that far to get things corrected. The bureaus don't believe in "mistakes" made by themselves or their subscribers.

Further having the paper trail helps later if things get reinserted into your report after they have been previously removed. With a verified paper record you can lay some smacketh down on the bureaus if they don't prevent your report from being repolluted with the inaccurate data.

So, given that you can decide which method is best for you.

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Methus, are you saying you send 1 letter per tradeline? You dont just send one letter with all the disputed TL's on it?

Yes. The reason is legal and procedural.

If you have a problem with getting one tradeline corrected and end up in court against the bureau, you don't want to have a letter with a ton of irrelavent stuff on it being read by a judge. You want your proof letter to be related only to what you want the judge to see.

Also, by spreading it out over several letters, you increase your chances of getting a lazy investigator at the bureaus and getting items simply removed. If you put it all on one letter, then the bureaus can count the whole kit-and-caboodle as just one dispute, because the FCRA is vague on what constitutes a dispute (one letter or one item).

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