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Negotiating Pay at annual review


chele444
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Hi everyone. I need some advice. I have an annual review coming up with the company I have been working with for 1 year. I have never had a raise or bonus or anything. At the review meeting I would like to ask for a raise.

According to Salary.com I am making around $10,000 less a year, than the least paid average wage in my area. That is nearly $5 more an hour!! I think my manager will pop a vein if I ask for more.

A little background, I got the job through a temp agency for a few month contract, and got hired . When I accepted the job, I was told $14.50 by the temp agency. Then a few days before the job started, they called me back and said "Oh so sorry, we made a mistake, it is only $13 an hour". Well I took the job regardless....I NEEDED it.

When I was hired on in fall by the company...I received no raise...I was sure I would atleast get my $14.50...Nope. So I am not certain if my employer even knows that the temp agency told me $14.50 to begin with.

I suppose my main questions are...how much should I ask for...should I ever mention what happened with the temp agency if no raise is forthcoming? What should I prepare (ie, a list of my duties etc) to back up how much I am asking. Thank you all for your help!

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To ask for a raise that big, you will need to justify it. Big Time. Your manager (more than likely) doesn't care what salary.com says... the worse thing to do when asking for a raise (IMHO) is to bring something like that from the internet up.

If you are doing a good job, I would try this approach:

Mr. Manager, I have been working here a year now, and as you can see from <insert all the terrific things you did here> I have really put my all into the job. I've not received any raises yet, but since I've had a chance to prove myself over the last year I'd like to ask for one now. I feel that <insert amount here - I would suggest $1.50-$2> would be appropriate, but I'm not sure what company policy is regarding raise amounts, so I know you will do the best you can for me.

Just my 2 cents

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According to Salary.com I am making around $10,000 less a year, than the least paid average wage in my area. That is nearly $5 more an hour!!!

Just so you can clarify... you must have meant to say, but neglected to say, that the average wage in your area for YOUR job and your specific DUTIES, right?

Averages are based on McDonald's workers and CEO's and then averaged out. Those figures are only helpful when broken down by profession.

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Asking for that huge of a pay raise prolly isn't going to work at this point in your career.

IME, if the company brings you in at a pretty low rate, odds are that's b/c they want to see if you can prove your worth to them. A good, reputable company will not underpay their employees. Doing so only increases turnover rates, and reduces the effectiveness of the workforce (they will spend more $$ on hiring and training new employees, only to lose them later on for underpaying them). If you are working at a company that values its' people, they should pay you close to what you are worth. When you have made your value in contributions to them, you're in a better position to negotiate for a more equitable raise.

I'd say that the best thing you can do is keep a VERY detailed log of EVERY SINGLE accomplishment you've done at your job in the past year (this is different from day to day job duties). Break it down by quarter. I have a word doc on my work PC in which I list every major issue/case/project I tackle, how that event benefitted the company, how much $$ I may have saved or made the company, how I worked on a team, or developed professionally or personally, etc.. Then at the end of each quarter, I set invest one hour to summarize things, set targets for the next quarter, and repeat each quarter.

When review time comes around, there's a small field where I'm asked to enter my achievements for the year. Most people in my group only put 3-4 key things down, but when I do a copy/paste from my Word doc into that small box, mine ends up taking up over 10 pages. By doing this, my boss is limited to either a) disputing my accomplishments - which he can't if they are factually accurate, B) agree that I've had a productive year and give me an appropriate merit adjustment (i.e. a raise).

Plus if I choose to update my resume later on, I can just refer back to my past evaluations to see what I've really done, and highlight those items as big accomplishments for a prospective employer to see.

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Asking for that huge of a pay raise prolly isn't going to work at this point in your career.

IME, if the company brings you in at a pretty low rate, odds are that's b/c they want to see if you can prove your worth to them. A good, reputable company will not underpay their employees. Doing so only increases turnover rates, and reduces the effectiveness of the workforce (they will spend more $$ on hiring and training new employees, only to lose them later on for underpaying them). If you are working at a company that values its' people, they should pay you close to what you are worth. When you have made your value in contributions to them, you're in a better position to negotiate for a more equitable raise.

I'd say that the best thing you can do is keep a VERY detailed log of EVERY SINGLE accomplishment you've done at your job in the past year (this is different from day to day job duties). Break it down by quarter. I have a word doc on my work PC in which I list every major issue/case/project I tackle, how that event benefitted the company, how much $$ I may have saved or made the company, how I worked on a team, or developed professionally or personally, etc.. Then at the end of each quarter, I set invest one hour to summarize things, set targets for the next quarter, and repeat each quarter.

When review time comes around, there's a small field where I'm asked to enter my achievements for the year. Most people in my group only put 3-4 key things down, but when I do a copy/paste from my Word doc into that small box, mine ends up taking up over 10 pages. By doing this, my boss is limited to either a) disputing my accomplishments - which he can't if they are factually accurate, B) agree that I've had a productive year and give me an appropriate merit adjustment (i.e. a raise).

Plus if I choose to update my resume later on, I can just refer back to my past evaluations to see what I've really done, and highlight those items as big accomplishments for a prospective employer to see.

:shock::!::idea: *Takes Notes*

I would suggest sending out some resumes and see what kind of offers you get. You don't have to rub the offers in your employers face, but going in knowing you can get more elsewhere, or even just knowing you can easily get another (possibly better) job making the same amount will give you a great confidence boost when going into the review meeting. It will definitely show and may make a difference when you ask for your reasonable raise. I did this and when I went to my boss requesting more money, he could not offer much in terms of a raise but did offer me a better position in the company which paid more. No complaints from me!

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oh this sounds soooo familiar. and masterP you are wrong. even the best and biggest companys will underpay their employees...

i started out at BofA as a temp. i was making $45 an hour with them. so i just knew when i went full time i'd get more..WRONG! they cut my pay by $5 an hour..i was salary but it all equaled the same. i did point this out to my manager at my review..and for the next two years i recv'd a 9% pay raise..and i recv'd a much larger bonus then most...still didn't catch up..but anyway..it happens.

my dxh works for wachovia as a developer/programmer whatever..they are ALL underpaid..so wachovia is slowing trying to catch them up to what they should maker..or get them in at least the 50% range.

so it does happen in any company any size...it doesn't hurt to ask for a raise. i did before my review...and got the "we know you are underpaid but its not in the budget at this time for a raise..we will talk next review". :roll:

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Some more info: Yes the pay stats I pulled are for my position, years of experience, duties etc.

My official title is Admin Asst, but to be honest, I do everything from HR, to office manager, to AP/AR, to technical reporting, sales...everything.

The job is super stressful, there are constant miscommunications

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I would take MasterP_Nice advice in listing your duties to help build your job description. I assume you "brought" your experience with you and did not receive a lot of training on the job. Do you have foreign language skills that assist you in your work? You should go in prepared to discuss your work duties, training, accomplishments and previous employment experience. I would assume your employer already has an idea what they intend to offer you; you might want to see that offer on the table before you discuss a specific wage increase.

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