lolah

*B* finally working for me!

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Yep...understand the theory.

But...by law, all inquiries stay on your reports for two years...period. There must be something going on we don't know about.

My theory is that the CRAs have some loophole that allows them to only show YOU a certain number of inquiries...and therefore it appears as though the baddies were being bumped.

Do we have an evidence from someone else pulling your reports...like a mortgage broker...that says that bumpage works?

I do think it works...I use 2 services and I used MYFICO.com to pull my actual report...MYFICO is supposed to be where you get your complete report and scores...I compared with the bank and they were the same...only mine was nicer since MYFICO prints out such a nice report.

JMHO

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Anyone had this experience if you print out report?

Just a wierd fact someone told me...

Using backdoors and pulling reports works an takes awhile, BUT~!! if you actually pull your report in printer form and print it out it is supposed to work faster...

I have seen some movement, not sure what caused it, but I have been printing my reports.

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Alrighty then, straight from the (dead) horse's mouth, here's the way FICO views inquiries...

How the FICO Score

Counts Inquiries

As explained in the last section, a search for new credit

can mean greater credit risk. This is why the FICO

score counts inquiries—requests a lender makes for

your credit report or score when you apply for credit.

FICO scores consider inquiries very carefully, as not all

inquiries are related to credit risk. There are three things

to note here:

Inquiries don’t affect scores that much. For most

people, one additional credit inquiry will take less than

five points off their FICO score. However, inquiries can

have a greater impact if you have few accounts or a

short credit history. Large numbers of inquiries also

mean greater risk: People with six inquiries or more

on their credit reports are eight times more likely to

declare bankruptcy than people with no inquiries on

their reports.

Many kinds of inquiries aren’t counted at all. The score

does not count it when you order your credit report or

credit score from a credit reporting agency or the

myFICO service. Also, the score does not count

requests a lender has made for your credit report or

score in order to make you a “pre-approved” credit

offer, or to review your account with them, even though

you may see these inquiries on your credit report.

Requests that are marked as coming from employers

are not counted either.

The score looks for “rate shopping.” Looking for a

mortgage or an auto loan may cause multiple lenders

to request your credit report, even though you’re only

looking for one loan. To compensate for this, the score

counts multiple inquiries in any 14-day period as just

one inquiry. In addition, the score ignores all inquiries

made in the 30 days prior to scoring. So if you find a

loan within 30 days, the inquiries won’t affect your

score while you’re rate shopping.

You can read the whole thing at http://www.fairisaac.com/NR/rdonlyres/DA689E4A-08E8-42C7-9DD0-1D87FA6ED726/0/UnderstandCreditScoreBklt.pdf

The implication of this is that there is much, much more to how inquiries affect your actual FICO scores than simply the number of inquiries that you can see on your reports.

A thorugh search of the internet...including .GOV sites...basically says this.

1. There is a huge amount of anecdotal evidence that pulling your TransUnion and Equifax scores yourself on a daily basis will create "soft pulls" that will...after 64 or so for TransUnion and after 95-100 or so for Equifax...cause "hard pulls" to disappear from the reports that you see. The same sites report that this does NOT appear to work on Experian.

2. By daily bumping your reports your run two large and significant risks:

a.) you may wind up with a "split file" (too many records in your data cause their system to only retrieve part of them....which part is difficult to predict and even harder to repair).

b.) you may wind up "banned" from the sites that allow daily pulls. Since this apparently doesn't happen to everyone, there must be something unique about the data for those folks that get banned.

3. Anyone who is thinking about advancing you credit (with the possible exceptions of credit card companies) usually rely on a "tri-merge" or pull each of the three major CRAs individually. They will see ALL "hard" inquiries on Experian.

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I am down from 18 (give or take) to 4 INQs from TU. I started on 12/28/07. I'd probably be down to 0 but like a moron, I keep applying for new credit thinking I can.

I'm not applying anymore and will focus on rebuilding with what I got and getting rid of baddies, but I will say that I do believe in *b, bumping, whatever you want to call it.

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