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18 yo girl dies during breast augmentation


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This girl was still in highschool. WTF were her parents thinking? And look at teh numbers for plastic surgery for teenage girls at the end. Pretty scary.

http://www.palmbeachpost.com/localnews/content/south/epaper/2008/03/25/m1a_cheerleader_0324.html

Tuesday, March 25, 2008

Stephanie Kuleba had a charmed life: captain of the varsity cheerleading squad at West Boca High, a nearly perfect grade-point average, good looks and a ticket to the University of Florida, where she would start her journey toward becoming a medical doctor.

Her friends said she was "perfect," so when Kuleba died Saturday of complications from breast augmentation surgery, none of them could understand how the girl whose success in life "was a sure thing" could perish in such a strange and devastating fashion.

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"She was a role model for a lot of people," said friend and classmate Vicky Goldring, 16. "She was incredibly smart. She wanted to help people. She was just a happy 18-year-old girl."

While no official cause of death was released by authorities or Kuleba's family, many of her friends said she suffered a severe reaction to anesthesia given to her during a breast augmentation procedure Friday night.

Paramedics were called to an outpatient surgery center at 1905 Clint Moore Road in Boca Raton and rushed Kuleba to Delray Medical Center, where she died Saturday.

"The surgery itself was very personal," said Benny Perlman, a friend of Kuleba's who spoke on behalf of her grieving family Monday night. "She passed away from complications during surgery.

"She was a wonderful person and she changed all our lives."

Kuleba was beloved by classmates at West Boca High, more than 400 of whom gathered outside the school Sunday night for a candlelight vigil. They hung Kuleba's shining silver pompons and cheerleading T-shirt on the fence outside the school and left flowers, pictures and handwritten notes beneath the display.

One note had lyrics to Hey Jude, a Beatles song that Kuleba loved.

"Take a sad song and make it better," the note read.

In her reserved "senior" parking spot, the one where she parked her white Lexus every school day, friends placed more flowers, teddy bears and pictures.

"It's hard to believe she's gone," said classmate Vanessa Villegas 16. "She just made everybody's day by having a good attitude about life. Today was a hard day for a lot of people."

Organizers charged $1 for each candle at the vigil - money that will be given to Kuleba's family for expenses.

With her long blond hair and shy smile, Kuleba charmed people from an early age, friends said. A talented athlete, her path toward cheerleading began with competitive gymnastics.

In 2000, National Gymnastics of Boca Raton took 30 of its students, including Kuleba, to one of the nation's biggest gymnastics invitationals - the Gasparilla Gymnastics Classic in Tampa. Competing in bars, beam, floor and vault against others in her age group and skill level, an 11-year-old Kuleba placed first all-around.

"She was very talented," said Leila Milgrim, 16, a friend of Kuleba's. "She was a great athlete. And she had all of these other things going for her, too. She did everything well."

Kuleba had brains to match her beauty, friends said, earning a GPA above 4.0, acing advanced placement courses and earning an acceptance letter from the University of Florida.

She was excited about taking pre-med courses in Gainesville. But the day she really looked forward to was in May, when she was to go to her senior prom for one last hurrah with her friends.

She'd just bought a stunning dress and made plans with a date.

"It was a great time in her life," said friend and classmate Larraine Saavedra, 16.

Cheerleading and academics made for a rigorous schedule but Kuleba still spent three years working an after-school waitressing job at a Rotelli's restaurant.

On her days off she would often stop by the restaurant with friends and order her favorite dish: a Malibu salad with fresh mozzarella.

Her name is still scribbled on the Rotelli's schedule, slated to work after school Thursday.

"She was fantastic and she stood out, because of how positive and friendly she was," said Cathy Bilotti, 37, who owns the Rotelli's. "She had a glow about her that attracted and soothed people."

Like many of Kuleba's friends, Bilotti said she had heard her employee's death stemmed from complications during surgery.

"If you knew her, you wouldn't think she needed that," said Bilotti. "She's perfect."

In recent years, doctors have performed an increasing number of procedures such as breast implants, liposuction and tummy tucks on young women and even girls as young as 14.

The enormous popularity of reality TV shows like Extreme Makeover have fueled the desire of adolescent girls to alter their bodies permanently, and they are finding more surgeons willing to oblige them. Breast implants and liposuction are now bestowed by parents as graduation or birthday gifts. Some doctors say they have performed breast augmentations on Baby Boomer mothers and their teenage daughters.

From 2002 to 2003, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, the number of women and girls 18 and younger who got breast implants nearly tripled, from 3,872 to 11,326.

Among all age groups, cosmetic implants have skyrocketed in popularity, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Last year, according to the ASPS, about 247,000 women got implants for augmentation, compared with 32,000 in 1992.

Anesthesia is a way to control pain using medication. In rare cases, allergic reaction to local or general anesthetic can create health risks or even cause death.

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In her reserved "senior" parking spot, the one where she parked her white Lexus every school day, friends placed more flowers, teddy bears and pictures.

I wonder what her parents drove around in...

However, if the anesthesia did it, then it wasn't really the boob job... Any surgery had the potential of doing this to her...

As for kids getting a new rack, one issue is that some girls are still developing and may still get a growth spurt although I wonder if there is a way to identify when that has ended...

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It's not uncommon for free standing surgical centers not to have dantrium..

I wonder how often their sodasorbs were changed out.

Every place that adminsters general anesthesia should have a malignant hyperthermia kit and someone in charge to maintian it.

"If in fact the medical examiner does come back and indicates to us that the cause of death was Malignant Hypothermia the questions are now going to be: 'Why wasn't she diagnosed quickly? Why wasn't she administered Dantrolene? And if she was administered Dantrolene, was it done at the appropriate times and in the appropriate dosages?' " Stanziale asked.

That lawyer doesn't even know the name of the disease he is saying the dr's missed, how obnoxious.

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Well, obviously it's sad that she was getting a boob job at 18. I'm guessing any good plastic surgeon wouldn't have done it without involving the parents in the decision (even thought she legally didnt have to) But I am wondering why was she put under general anesthesia for a boob job??

I think it's pretty common practice to give a mild sedative (iv) and lots of local lidocaine. The procedure barely takes an hour from start to finish.

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Well, obviously it's sad that she was getting a boob job at 18. I'm guessing any good plastic surgeon wouldn't have done it without involving the parents in the decision (even thought she legally didnt have to) But I am wondering why was she put under general anesthesia for a boob job??

I think it's pretty common practice to give a mild sedative (iv) and lots of local lidocaine. The procedure barely takes an hour from start to finish.

::tina::....................:lol:

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I wonder what her parents drove around in...

I lived in Boca for a few years. The school parking lots really exemplify why I hate the area now. The teacher's lot is filled with average cars. The student's lot is a car lover's wet dream of luxury and sports cars that no child should be allowed to drive. Palm Beach county is the richest per capita in the nation.

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But I am wondering why was she put under general anesthesia for a boob job??

I think it's pretty common practice to give a mild sedative (iv) and lots of local lidocaine. The procedure barely takes an hour from start to finish.

Not since submuscular has been become the preferred placement, I think. I only know this because my wife just went through it a couple months ago. The doctor didn't even ask, he said this procedure is generally so intense he didn't like to risk on local anesthesia. We did our research, and this guy was known as one of the best in the region (Dr Calobrace), so we didn't argue. It was a quick procedure though.

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Not since submuscular has been become the preferred placement, I think. I only know this because my wife just went through it a couple months ago. The doctor didn't even ask, he said this procedure is generally so intense he didn't like to risk on local anesthesia. We did our research, and this guy was known as one of the best in the region (Dr Calobrace), so we didn't argue. It was a quick procedure though.

Mine are submuscular. I was barely out. My husband left to run to McDonalds and I was out of surgery before he even got back. There was nothing intense about it until the lidocaine wore off that night. :shock::?

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