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Ever have a CA park in front of your house?...


stalwart
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That is if your still able to call the police

True.

Honestly, I don't think this is a ring of thieves showing up in different cars on different days spread out over a couple weeks. This isn't a ritzy neighborhood, just a regular tract of homes in a quiet neighborhood. Well, quiet except for all the barking dogs.

One of the cars looked like a newer model Cadillac. Very fancy. Probably the nicest car that's ever been in this block. If that guy was casing the neighborhood, he's going to be sorely disappointed with what he finds in people's houses here.

On the other hand, maybe I'm being naive. He could've stolen that car. :lol:

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liann,

You need to stop and listen very closely to everyone. You have allowed this to get way beyond reality. It is now so far out, some may wonder if you can get back to normal. So let's recap some things here.

1. The stranger parked out front:

If you are afraid to approach and ask who they are, no problem. It does not mean you are a coward. If you are nervous about calling the police. No problem. Have a member of your household do so, or, call a neighbor and ask if they have noticed the car, and would they please call as you are hesitant to do so. No, you do not have to disclose your financial problems. Just the simple fact a stranger "bothers" you.

2. You say you live in Orange County, California:

This state has their own collection laws which takes precedence over the federal laws. In short, you have more protection. I recommended you go to page 1 in the "Collection" section here and click on the California laws. Do so and ask me about what you do not understand. Either here or by PM is fine.

3. The OC saying you have to deal with CA:

Understand there is no law written that demands or can force you to deal with their assignee. All you need to do is send the CA a letter demanding they cease and desist as you refuse to deal with a third party collector, and will only deal with the OC. Compose a letter to the OC stating you will only deal with them and include a copy of the CA letter. Be sure and include in both letters that no phone calls will be accepted and all further communications must be in writing. Send both by CMRR. To add, the original creditor, if they use their own internal collection department, they are bound by the laws of this state. I say this as if the OC kept calling you from their internal collections prior to the debt being charged off, they were liable under the California law. They are also liable for the actions of their assignee. If either break the state law, they also break the federal. And, most important, no one can force you into a new agreement or contract without your permission. In short, do not, for any reason, sign anything from either of them unless you ask us first. An example of this is if they write saying if you agree to pay this much, we will delete the negative, or some other offer of compromise. Do not sign until you ask us. Either way, write down the date and time each call was placed and keep a record.

As others have mentioned, if you see the license plate, mark it down along with the best description you can make of the car and it's driver. Note time and date. For now, begin your list of the times you did see the vehicle and note all you can recall to the best of your ability. Do not answer the phone if you do not recognize the caller. Most CA's will come through as "Unknown Name" and " Unknown Number", while others use the "Unavailable" with a number. The same goes if your Caller ID shows any 800, 866, or 888, do not answer them. If they leave messages, let them. Then listen to them to see if any illegal threats were made, or other words that can be used against them. An example here is if someone says "If you do not return the call, we will ????". Especially look for threats of calling police.

Lastly, if you decide to use a counselor to pay this, you need to ask us some questions which are very important when dealing with them. One big example is that many of them do not tell you directly that you must pay their fee first before they begin paying. Some never told the consumer that a particular creditor refused to deal with them. These are just a couple that others on this site found out the hard way. One found out months down the road when a CA/JDB contacted them.

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All you need to do is send the CA a letter demanding they cease and desist as you refuse to deal with a third party collector, and will only deal with the OC.

When I told one of the Chase reps that I refused to deal with the CA, she said I could do that and my account would be returned to Chase and Chase would assign it to another collection agency.

Do not answer the phone if you do not recognize the caller. Most CA's will come through as "Unknown Name" and " Unknown Number", while others use the "Unavailable" with a number. The same goes if your Caller ID shows any 800, 866, or 888, do not answer them.

I've been ignoring them or taking the phone off the hook. My favorite was the spoofed "500-000-0000" number.

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....Understand there is no law written that demands or can force you to deal with their assignee. All you need to do is send the CA a letter demanding they cease and desist as you refuse to deal with a third party collector, and will only deal with the OC...

Given that this OP is almost paralyzed with fear about being sued, I think that’s some very questionable advice…

I can’t think of any action more likely to get a debtor sued than to C&D a CA on a large, very recent CC debt that is still owned by the OC.

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Robert,

My aim on this is to remove the CA from the picture and get it back to the OC to work out fair arrangements. Remember, I said to tell them they would only deal with the OC. Main purpose is to hopefully see Chase agree to a payment plan, not adding more fees or interest, otherwise, this account will never get paid off. Remember, the words getting out about these CC's and how the consumers have been getting ripped off. And, many of these CCs are offering to assist people if they just call and ask. Yeah, right, I know! Basically, getting back to the OC could, in the end, allow the OP to save some money and get this paid off sooner. There are some other things that come into play here, but, unless it is necessary, I'll hold off. Do not want to add more confusion.

The OP has a solid reason for this by the strange vehicles lurking in the neighborhood, whether they are watching her or not. All that is necessary is to notify Chase of this and how it is threatening and so terrifying to where she does not want to leave her home. Remember, the OC in California can be held liable for the actions of their assignee. And, by including this in the letter, the OC is now on notice. Thus, they will watch themselves a little closer, maybe.

Chase is large, and most of their internal collections people have no concept of any law, nor, do they abide by them. When Chase calls you, the calls are made from an automatic dialing system, and, most often, the rep you talk to is in a foreign country. And, as Countrywide, these reps are only allowed to do one thing, which is to get an electronic check today. While going through this period, I called them weekly to keep them abreast of things, and they still called daily. They do not note in system anything you say, even if you said "I mailed it today". Until the payment is posted, the calls will continue. Chase had our mortgage and when we had our flood in 2006, we had to pay after the 15th until all back to normal. One of the calls they made to us, was an idiot in Panama. The same thing with Countrywide. They had our HELOC. I went off on them, big time. For the very same reason. Unfortunately for them, they were stupid and sent me an email asking how I was treated by their rep. Use your imagination on what I said. The next day they had a CS manager trying to talk to me. They wanted me to shut up. I refused. I told them exactly why and was now going to tell everyone I met on the street exactly how Countrywide feels about the consumer. My family and friends already knew. I Included the words that I was going to cost them millions in lost revenue. This went on for quite a while and they fiinally gave up. Even though BofA now owns them makes no difference to me. I'm still talking.

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If you have foreclosures in your neighborhood, all sorts of people might be parking for a time near one or more of them.

Appraisers and realtors. Potential homeowners, investors and investor wannabees and bird dogs for investors.

Just another potential explanation for this suspicious-looking types.

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LMAO!!! I know...ten pages of call the police and get over it doesn't seem to be quite enough.

Perhaps if folks would just take the letters "T-U-S-[F] or [H]", mix it up in the appropriate order, realize that they stand for the first letter of words that would totally make sense to this situation, then folks and perhaps the OP would get the light bulb lighting up and actually do it.

This thread really needs to die. 10 pages....really? [not totally] :confused:

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