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Lexis Nexis is not a CRA is it?


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Oh, and by the way, as in "CRA", I mean credit reporting agency that collects credit information and is required by law to supply consumers with credit scores.

L/N is a Consumer Reporting agency. They do not report credit scores though.

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Aren't they supposed to furnish a score though if a consumer asks for one?

They are not like EQ, TU or EX. Not all CRA's furnish scores (i.e. Choicepoint, MIB, L/N, etc.). There are HUNDREDS of CRA's out there. Not all are credit based.

Order your L/N report. You will be SHOCKED at the amount of info they acquire on you.

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They are not like EQ, TU or EX. Not all CRA's furnish scores (i.e. Choicepoint, MIB, L/N, etc.). There are HUNDREDS of CRA's out there. Not all are credit based.

Order your L/N report. You will be SHOCKED at the amount of info they acquire on you.

Hmmm... Well thanks.

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Choicepoint was spun off of EQ in 1997 where it was publicly traded company until it was purchased by the parent company of Lexis-Nexus a couple of years ago. Choicepoint is considered to be almost like a privately-owned CIA. The US federal government is their largest client.

Where ChoicePoint really got a boost is in 1999 when they acquired a company called WinShapes. WinShapes produced a product that took all the relationships between people from various databases and interlinked them in a visual, web-like matrix on a computer screen. By clicking on one of the nodes, it would move it to the center of the screen and show everyone that is connected to that person. This software was extensively used by the feds in the 9/11 investigations. Remember how they kept announcing Person A was connected to Person B?

When I say "connected", I mean everyone. I don't know what information they disclose to consumers, but I do know what kind of reports they used to produce around 2001. My report contained everything about me: name, every address I'd ever lived at, various professional licenses, weapons permits, criminal history, ssn, companies I'd been a part of, cars I'd ever owned, etc. It also contained the names, addresses, phone numbers, and SSNs of everyone in my immediate family and even the same details of my neighbors.

One interesting tidbit is that they obtain unlisted and cell phone numbers by buying the customer records from delivery pizza places. The delivery addresses are then easily cross referenced to data they already have. Nowadays, they're also heavily invested in harvesting data from the web--esp. Myspace and Facebook.

I know I might sound like a conspiracy nut, but ChoicePoint is one of the most dangerous companies in existence and most people have never even heard of them. (Everything I've mentioned is verifiable and isn't exactly top secret since various police departments around the country also use the software).

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A bit off topic, but even as a law student with limited access to LexisNexis, it is amazing what is out there on people. I suppose most of it is public record (voting registration, property ownership & mortgage records, birth and death records, criminal records, bankruptcy, professional licensure, etc.), but when you collate them into one place you can get a pretty good picture of one's life. And that's with the LIMITED law student version. The full version has "skip trace" and other features that really dig deep.

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The difference being my access is free as a student, whereas in practice you pay through the nose.

Next week I am taking a short class called "cost effective L/N searches". I'm a little skeptical. My L/N representative is hosting it. :lol:

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The difference being my access is free as a student, whereas in practice you pay through the nose.

Next week I am taking a short class called "cost effective L/N searches". I'm a little skeptical. My L/N representative is hosting it. :lol:

You should ask that rep whether or not L/N is a CRA.....see what kind of tap dancing answer you get.....

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"That rep" is under 25 yrs old and will probably ask me what a CRA is. They're trained to show you how the database works and to ease the progression fron student to practice. In other words, lock you in so you don't jump ship and use Westlaw.

Westlaw does the same thing. One day its donuts & coffee by the westlaw reps, and the next day its free pizza from the L/N reps. Not unlike bribery during high school elections....;)

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After calling L/N on the phone at 1-800-831-2578 I learned that they are just like a CRA and you can get one free copy per year.

Go to http://www.lexisnexis.com on the left side of the page there is a link hat says obtain copies of information about yourself.

LexisNexis Consumer Access Program

Attn: Consumer Inquiry Department

P.O. Box 810004

Boca Raton, FL 33481

You have to fill out the online form and send copies of two ID's one has to be a government ID like a DL the other can be as simple as a utility bill.

Hope this helps

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  • 4 months later...

Well I just read the fine print on the rush card.. says *RushPath to Credit will not help your current credit rating, record, or history with credit agencies that currently do not accept RushCard transaction history as part of their credit rating system. This is for the additional RP to credit program...

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Back in 2006 and 2007, Lexis routinely denied being a CRA and they refused to provide reports directly to consumers. Eventually I figured out that a couple of Lexis subsidiaries were in the business of selling "person reports", which fall under the FCRA definition of a consumer report.

I sent a written request directly to both subsidiaries asking for a free copy of my "person report". They initially refused to provide it for free, so I sent a letter via Certified Mail stating my Intent to Sue. VIOLA -- they finally complied!

I believe there were a few other consumers who actually filed suit to fight this practice, although it is very likely that Lexis settled long before the trial dates. Anyway, these lawsuits (or maybe some FTC action?) must have finally persuadeed them to change their tune.

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