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Goofy Lawyer question ::idea2::

xsnakeyx Goofy lawyer has a corporation named after himself as his law firm, called ''Goofy Lawyer PA and associates LLC''

Attorneys fees are awarded to the :conspiracy: Goofy lawyer as sanctions against the defendant.

:boxing: Defendant try's to get attorney fees dismissed, because the Goofy lawyer is a ''pro se Plaintiff'' suing for himself.

Goofy lawyer tells the xrulesx Judge that the corporation ''he owns alone'' has to be represented by an attorney and that he is it ::linedancers::. he said this gives him the right to collect attorneys as sanctions awarded by the court. :Domina:

Goofy Lawyer admits during court that he didn't pay him self for the time he has spent as an attorney for his own firm in an effort to compel discovery.

Now Goofy is trying to claim ''Attorney Client Privileges'' :MoreBeer:. can he do that?

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Wow, thats interesting I want to see what answers you get on that one, because I thought the same rules apply to all parties acting in per se(pro per) that you are either entitled to them when a lawyer actually reps your case or your not when acting in per se. I guess its at the judges discretion than:confused::confused::confused:.

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He would do much better pleading the 5th Amendment.

Claims for costs must be leaglly recoverable. In general terms and to keep it simple this means "reasonable" costs paid or costs billed and due. If there was no payment or no demonstrable intent to bill and collect and create a legal obligation we are sailing very close to the wind as regards fraud. There is also the often ignored little issue of conflict. In the event of non payment would the corporation be able to sue the client? Who executed the lawyer/client agreement? Is he claiming he contracted with himself in effect and represented both parties? He is walking through a minefield of his own making here if what you tell us is accurate.

Both procedural and professional standards codes deal with this issue. A little research on both in the applicable state should provide the answer you need.

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Wow, thats interesting I want to see what answers you get on that one, because I thought the same rules apply to all parties acting in per se(pro per) that you are either entitled to them when a lawyer actually reps your case or your not when acting in per se. I guess its at the judges discretion than:confused::confused::confused:.

XtypeX as to the attorney pro se thing, I'm not sure if I just didn't submitted the right evidence or what ::idea2:: . I'm going to try to bring this up again.

Thanks!

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First: Why did the court award sanctions? Discovery, etc.?

Second: Does the law firm own the debt or are they representing another entity? In short, is the caption Law Firm v. You?

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He would do much better pleading the 5th Amendment.

Claims for costs must be leaglly recoverable. In general terms and to keep it simple this means "reasonable" costs paid or costs billed and due. If there was no payment or no demonstrable intent to bill and collect and create a legal obligation we are sailing very close to the wind as regards fraud. There is also the often ignored little issue of conflict. In the event of non payment would the corporation be able to sue the client? Who executed the lawyer/client agreement? Is he claiming he contracted with himself in effect and represented both parties? He is walking through a minefield of his own making here if what you tell us is accurate.

Both procedural and professional standards codes deal with this issue. A little research on both in the applicable state should provide the answer you need.

In my motion regarding this, I asked for a copy of the receipts ::tp:: that show that he paid himself, then the Goofy lawyer motioned for :-)= protection of privileged information.

His motion for protection didn't come up during the hearing :hmmmmm:. but during the hearing on my motion objecting to him being paid as a pro se, I got him to admit that he has not paid himself for time he spent in his efforts to compel discovery against me. But the:Domina:Judge still granted him the attorneys fees as sanctions anyway. iT was not reasonable costs. I wish. it was.

You asked, Who executed the lawyer:lagerlouts:client agreement? if you are referring to him being a lawyer for his own corporation/lawfirm, that he owns alone. xfishx I have no idea how that would work? That's why I wanted him to show proof that he paid himself. IT'S VERY CONFUSING!

I bet a HUNDRED DOLLARS that he doesn't pay taxes on the sanctions I had to pay him... xsnakeyx 2,500.00

Thanks for the info. :)%

:titanic:

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First: Why did the court award sanctions? Discovery, etc.?

Second: Does the law firm own the debt or are they representing another entity? In short, is the caption Law Firm v. You?

XtypeX I got sanctioned for not answering the interrogatories, I made a good effort to answer the questions 3 times, and provide documents but still got sanctions anyway. I can't answer questions that I have no idea of. I motioned for a more definite statement, but was denied.

I hired this Goofy xpiratex attorney who is sole owner of his law firm/corporation, then fired him because he would not do anything but send out settlement offers for 9 months. He also did a LOT of other stuff.and would not file a complaint. As far as I am concerned, he is a Plaintiff pro se, wether he works for his own corp or not. Right?

:titanic:

http://thenickekonomideslitigationwebsite.blogspot.com/

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Review Florida Rules of Civil Procedure 1.380.

I believe the court messed up when it based sanctions on attorneys fees. It can award sanctions based on what it deems appropriate. In this case, a sanction based on attorneys fees in your case may be unjust. I would file a motion for rehearing on the matter of sanctions. Review the rules of procedure as you may have a time limit on how soon you must file the motion and set the hearing. This may be something you might want to appeal.

Google: 2007 handbook on discovery practice

The Handbook should prove very helpful. It was created by the Trial Lawyers section of the Florida Bar and is free.

I would agree that he should be considered pro se.

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:troll: or just plain crazy ? lol

This has to be the most bizzare set of circumstances I have read on here.

It is nuts, but not all that uncommon in Florida. We have a lot of former prosecutors working the civil docket. Their knowledge and comfort with civil litigation is not great.

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It is nuts, but not all that uncommon in Florida. We have a lot of former prosecutors working the civil docket. Their knowledge and comfort with civil litigation is not great.

WOW it is a whole different world down there lol

It will either make you very rich or completely insane good luck.

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