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Anyone have experience with MRSA?

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Hey all!

Wondering if anyone has any experience with the "super bug" MRSA? My daughter is living in a group home for developmentally disabled young women and they are moving in a new client that has it - a little bird told me about the MRSA, concerned for my daughter's and the other client's safety. This little bird could lose her job for informing me of this, but the company that runs the homes wasn't going to. My daughter is in overall good health, but frequently has open skin due to some of her behaviors. The staff may know enough to wash their hands well and use universal precautions, but the other roommates certainly don't have the rationale to do so. I am worried this company is knowingly putting my daughter and the other client's at risk by bringing in this new girl. I don't want to remove my daughter if I don't have to - the staff are great, she has difficulty with transitions as it is (a move would be very upsetting) - but I also want to protect her. Safety is always #1!

If anyone has experience with this disease and can advise, I would be very grateful. I've gotten mixed "answers" from researching it online, some sites claiming it's not that big of a deal while other's say avoid it at all costs. If nothing else, I will talk to my daughter's doctor but I thought I'd run it past ya'll first.

P.S. I also found out that this company has another home that started with 1 MRSA client and now all 4 of the client's have it, so obviously they didn't keep it from spreading in one of their other homes. The company gave my daughter's home hand foam and claims to their employees that this alone will keep everyone safe!:hmmmmm:

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Hey all!

Wondering if anyone has any experience with the "super bug" MRSA? My daughter is living in a group home for developmentally disabled young women and they are moving in a new client that has it - a little bird told me about the MRSA, concerned for my daughter's and the other client's safety. This little bird could lose her job for informing me of this, but the company that runs the homes wasn't going to. My daughter is in overall good health, but frequently has open skin due to some of her behaviors. The staff may know enough to wash their hands well and use universal precautions, but the other roommates certainly don't have the rationale to do so. I am worried this company is knowingly putting my daughter and the other client's at risk by bringing in this new girl. I don't want to remove my daughter if I don't have to - the staff are great, she has difficulty with transitions as it is (a move would be very upsetting) - but I also want to protect her. Safety is always #1!

If anyone has experience with this disease and can advise, I would be very grateful. I've gotten mixed "answers" from researching it online, some sites claiming it's not that big of a deal while other's say avoid it at all costs. If nothing else, I will talk to my daughter's doctor but I thought I'd run it past ya'll first.

P.S. I also found out that this company has another home that started with 1 MRSA client and now all 4 of the client's have it, so obviously they didn't keep it from spreading in one of their other homes. The company gave my daughter's home hand foam and claims to their employees that this alone will keep everyone safe!:hmmmmm:

Yes,MRSA can be transmitted by contact, if the new resident has a "active" infection they should use pre cautions and not touch other residents, if the new resident is on medications, transmittal is low, yes it can happen but the odds are much lower, FIY many people Carry MRSA and have no clue,ALWAYS request testing if your going to have surgery

request( ok demand) that the home ALWAYS use a disinfectant after toileting, showers, ect,( hepatitis is also a common problem in "group home settings") if the new resident has a proper dressing in place it shouldnt be to much of a worry( make sure dressings are disposed in a RED hazard container out of reach of the residents) It takes normally around 4-6 weeks to clear a MRSA infection, also make sure your own daughters open wounds are properly dressed at all times,,

( I have been a caregiver many years& personally had MRSA. Hep & HIV/AIDS, Cancer,& Hospice clients)

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Protocol for Multidrug Resistant Organisms (MDRO’s)

Rationale:

The primary measures for preventing cross contamination and transmission of all pathogenic organisms, including those resistant to antibiotics, is strict adherence to recommended infection control practices/hospital policies which include the following:

· Hand Hygiene, Medical Asepsis, Environmental/Equipment Cleaning Standard/Transmission Based Precautions.

Additional isolation measures may be applied on a case by case basis.

The Multi-Drug Resistant Organism Protocol applies to the following organisms identified by positive culture from any body site:

· All aerobic gram negative rods* resistant to the following classes of antimicrobial agents (all agents reported on the sensitivity panel):

Aminoglycosides

Penicillins

Cephalosporins

Quinolones

Trimethoprim/sulfa

Carbapenems

Due to increased resistance isolation will also be implemented upon:

Acinetobacter baumanii (all strains, all body sites)

Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

Vancomycin Intermediate Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VISA)

Vancomycin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA)

Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE)

MDRO Isolation in Non-Critical Care:

Due to lower risk of transmission in non-critical care areas, only patients with the following MDRO’s will be identified:

MRSA: Confirmed MRSA in cases draining abscesses and tracheotomies. Initiate isolation per culture and risk of transmission: Call infection control for guidance.

VISA or VRSA culture pending (suspected) or positive.

Acinetobacter baumanii resistant to all agents listed on sensitivity panel.

Process:

The following is the process for initiating patient isolation precautions after laboratory identification of a culture positive for MDROs noted above:

· Any caregiver of the patient may institute isolation.

· The Laboratory will notify the critical care units and Infection Control of the MDRO.

· Upon receiving laboratory notification, place the patient in appropriate transmission based precautions

· The patient should remain in isolation until discharged from the critical care setting: Contact Infection Control for guidance regarding cases in prolonged isolation.

· Patients admitted with recent documentation of positive MDRO (within 1 week prior to admission): Contact Infection Control.

Cleaning of Patient Rooms: Call EVS for Terminal Clean

·When isolation is discontinued

·When patient is discharged

·Remember in semi-private room to leave the isolation sign posted and hold admission to second bed until room is cleaned. EVS will remove the isolation sign when the room is clean. Until room is clean all persons entering this environment are required to where protective gear.

Mybe check the CDC website

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again if the staff is following what i have posted to op,

if its not "active" they will not isolate a pt,. always demand staff clean/ disinfect, toilet, shower ect areas after pt use, **this should be done anyways as a normal infection control measure to include door knobs!( so many forget them)

Proper dressings and wound care is IMPORTANT to advoid any infections, also the disposal of dressings in a bio hazard container

a properly trained cargegiver should know and follow precautions for infection control, NO caregiver wants MRSA in any PT, let alone several( this means alot of work), OP has no idea if the new resident has been treated, meds or other, this "little bird" was out of line in some points, yes they care about her Daughter but until she has all the facts , really shouldnt raise a big "warning flag" could be very well that the infection could be resolved before new resident is even placed in the home,

OP-FYI the little bird violated HIPPA, Privacy laws and more and Could face a licence lost, fines and Jail,, I would wonder, what has this "little bird" has said about YOUR daughter?? its the managers/owners responsablity to inform Pts/ residents and POA about the new resident .

If your really concerned about the infection control or lack of, you may request the Licence dept do a home inspection ,

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I have staph at the beginning of April and because it was my 2nd staph infect in 1 year they just automatically treated it as MRSA at the hospital. Search for MRSA here an you will find my thread.

it took over a month of various treatments and they never did confirm if I had it or not.

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Thanks everyone for your input about this. I spoke to my daughter's doctor today and was well assured that if we stress the importance of good hygiene(handwashing) to our daughter and staff keep things clean she should be in no greater danger than she would be, say, in school. Although in her home it would be a slightly greater risk due to closer quarters.

As for the "little bird" I am well aware, as a former health care worker myself, of the violation that has taken place. And I do trust her with my daughter, she's done a fabulous job with her. I will continue to keep an eye on all things pertaining to my daughter and watch for any problems or potential breaches of policy.

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I just thought I would chime in my two cents on this, as a professional in a healthcare environment, my department does deal with infection control, especially MRSA.

My husband works in the behavioral med portion of our organization on an adolescent inpatient ward. He works mostly with the boys. Their carpets and certain parts of the ward have been cultured for MRSA, and while we follow all CDC guidelines and suggestions, because of the "nature of the beast", we have been unable to get rid of it.

HOWEVER: this has not led to any change in the rate of patient infections. As I said, these are adolescent boys and they keep their rooms in a locker-room-type state, which breeds MRSA like CRAZY, they are allowed to play football outside, and they get rough and tumble with the staff, often leading to open wounds.

My suggestion would be to ask your doctor about setting a culturing protocol for when your daughter has any wounds that do not clear up in a certain time frame. That way, instead of going straight for antibiotics, the culture can be done if anything "just doesn't look right" and treatment can be sooner, rather than later.

While MRSA is dangerous, I will tell you that it IS common in healthcare settings, group homes, nursing homes, assisted living facilities, locker rooms, military installations, schools, etc.....

The best thing you can do is be proactive. Even MRSA in wounds is not that bad initially. The longer it goes, the worse it gets.

Good luck!

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Thank you very much for that advice, Glitter! I think I am a very lucky parent to have staff and medical professionals so involved with my daughter's care - everyone on my daughter's "team" really go above and beyond for her...which can sometimes really take a load off my and my husband's shoulders!

Also, the "little bird" had a learning experience with all of this, too. We've all gotten more information and that has eased our fears considerably!

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