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Received a letter of Interrogation from GE Money Bank!


Katie81
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Hi,

I had a judgement filed against me in 2005 by GE Money Bank. I did not show up at the court hearing, but got a letter at that time in the mail from the courts saying that I owed GE Money Bank$624 and that I must pay it or my waged would be attached. I never paid anything to them and never heard from them until I just got a letter in the mail today, over 5 years later.

I got a letter from a law office that states "As a judgement creditor, GE Money Bank has a right to ask questions about your income and assetts. Enclosed is a set of Interrogatories that, by law, you must answer and return to this law firm within thirty days of the date of this letter. In lieu of providing formal responses to the enclosed Interrogatories, please contact our office, as we have been directed to conduct meaningful settlement discussions. Our client is willing to accept either a lump sum settlement or monthly installment payments to satisfy the judgement entered against you. Please read the instructions carefully and answer the questions fully."

So, here are my questions: 1. Am I really required to answer these questions? They get quite personal(asking the names, ages, and addresses of my children and present or former spouse)

2. I am in the process of cleaning up my credit so I would really like to get this judgement off of my credit. Should I ask them to remove it from my credit? If yes, should I offer them the full amount or a lesser amount? and if no or if they refuse to remove it, how much do i offer them as a settlement?

3. If I call and work out a settlement with them do I still answer all of the invasive questions?

Thanks in advance for any much need answers you can give me! I really appreciate it! :)

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Guest usctrojanalum

1. Am I really required to answer these questions?

Yes.

2. I am in the process of cleaning up my credit so I would really like to get this judgement off of my credit. Should I ask them to remove it from my credit? If yes, should I offer them the full amount or a lesser amount? and if no or if they refuse to remove it, how much do i offer them as a settlement?

Ask them if you can settle the account in exchange for the judgment being vacated. Is a good option. As for a number it depends, low ball them first.

3. If I call and work out a settlement with them do I still answer all of the invasive questions?

Nope!

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Hi,

I had a judgement filed against me in 2005 by GE Money Bank. I did not show up at the court hearing, but got a letter at that time in the mail from the courts saying that I owed GE Money Bank$624 and that I must pay it or my waged would be attached. I never paid anything to them and never heard from them until I just got a letter in the mail today, over 5 years later.

I got a letter from a law office that states "As a judgement creditor, GE Money Bank has a right to ask questions about your income and assetts. Enclosed is a set of Interrogatories that, by law, you must answer and return to this law firm within thirty days of the date of this letter. In lieu of providing formal responses to the enclosed Interrogatories, please contact our office, as we have been directed to conduct meaningful settlement discussions. Our client is willing to accept either a lump sum settlement or monthly installment payments to satisfy the judgement entered against you. Please read the instructions carefully and answer the questions fully."

So, here are my questions: 1. Am I really required to answer these questions? They get quite personal(asking the names, ages, and addresses of my children and present or former spouse)

2. I am in the process of cleaning up my credit so I would really like to get this judgement off of my credit. Should I ask them to remove it from my credit? If yes, should I offer them the full amount or a lesser amount? and if no or if they refuse to remove it, how much do i offer them as a settlement?

3. If I call and work out a settlement with them do I still answer all of the invasive questions?

Thanks in advance for any much need answers you can give me! I really appreciate it! :)

Who sent you the collection letter? Is it the Law Office that obtained the default judgment? If not, where is the proof that they have any authority to contact you on any alleged debt?

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Who sent you the collection letter? Is it the Law Office that obtained the default judgment? If not, where is the proof that they have any authority to contact you on any alleged debt?

It is the attorney for GE Money Bank that sent me the letter.

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Yes.

Ask them if you can settle the account in exchange for the judgment being vacated. Is a good option. As for a number it depends, low ball them first.

Nope!

So I called the attorney's office today and asked if I can settle my account in exchange for the judgement being vacated. The man who answered the phone didn't know what I was talking about so he put me on the phone with the attorney.

The attorney said he never heard the term vacated before and that he didn't know what I was talking about. He said that if I settled the account they would satisfy the judgement. He said he is not familiar with the term vacate. I told him I just want the judgement removed from my credit altogether however that is done. He said that he is not aware of anyway to do that besides a dismissal which is only done before a judgement goes to court. He told me that if somebody could explain to him how to

"vacate" a judgement he would be happy to look into it. Any ideas on what to do? Thank you!

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I would assume so, they sued me in 2005..

How do you know GE Money Bank sued you, I'm not talking about talking to a Law Firm, I'm talking about contacting GE Money Bank, playing dumb and asking about the status of your account. Don't mention a judgment, just ask for the status of your account. Lawsuits get filed all the time with the named Plaintiff having no knowledge of the suit. It happened to me twice with Discover Bank.

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Guest usctrojanalum
It's too late to vacate the judgment - this needs to happen within a year of the judgment being granted.

In almost every single State both parties can stipulate to vacate a judgment at any time.

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