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Does it help to speak with a "manager"?


seekingpeace
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All the things I read say if you don't get what you want from the first person, ask to speak to their manager. Some of them say you can, but they'll tell you the same thing that they don't have any different authority than I do and that this is as low as it will go. Is this right? I always have in mind, never take a "no" from someone who can't say "yes" but from what some of them say, it is what it is! What have you all found?

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It all boils down to if they are worried that you will go over their head, and anger their boss. Nobody likes to be called about something that should have been taken care of at a lower level. They also don't like employees to bring possible legal action raining down on them. This advice doesn't apply to debt collectors as none of them in the whole chain of command gives a rats as about consumer complaints, and would probably give a bonus to anyone who made you cry.

Just my thoughts.

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Usually, their "manager" is the person sitting at the next call station...in other words, just another phone jerk. On the other hand, if they say "hold on, I'll let you speak to my manager" it means they're going to turn the call over to the "owner" of the call center, who's usually the meanest SOB in the builfing.

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Some of them say you can, but they'll tell you the same thing that they don't have any different authority than I do and that this is as low as it will go. Is this right?

The answer is a resounding NO. If the supervisor had no authority beyond the reps who report to him, and had no more knowledge than them, he would not usually get to be a supervisor. Always ask for a supervisor if you get the run around, or if you get a rep's response that makes no sense to you. Sometimes you can also ask for the supervisor's manager. Often, an escalation request alone would get the rep to try other things which they would not otherwise. Some big OC's also have whole different collection escalation areas. With Citi it's called MAU (Managers Assistance Unit), Recovery Escalations, etc.

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