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What does "confer" mean and how do you do it?


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Ok I need some more help if anyone is willing.

In my lawsuit with Discover i sent them about 30 questions during the discovery process which they simply refused to answer. I filed a motion to compel and I

must have done it wrong because the judge never compelled them to answer them.

At the status hearing I just went to I was told that I need to "confer" with Discover before the next status hearing.

Can anyone explain what confer means and how I would go about doing it.

I assume it has to do with discussing the questions I asked during discovery and which ones we both agree are relevant, but I am not sure.

If anyone can enlighten me about this process I would appreciate it.

also, does anyone know of a good, free, online place to get a primer on the basics of law and procedure so that I can limit how often I make a fool out of myself.

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Can anyone explain what confer means and how I would go about doing it.

You may have seen posts where I've made reference to something called a "golden rule letter."

In the context of discovery disputes, most courts require that before a party may file a motion to compel, he must make a good faith attempt to resolve the discovery dispute without court intervention. That usually involves the requesting party sending a letter to the other side stating, essentially, "I don't agree with your responses, here is why, and if you don't respond fully, I'm going to file a motion to compel."

If he does so, and still cannot resolve the matter, the requesting party may file the motion to compel. The motion to compel must include a sworn statement that you have attempted to "confer" with the other party regarding the discovery dispute and and have not been able to reach a resolution. You attach the letter, your discovery requests, your memorandum, etc., to the motion, and then you file it.

If you don't do all these things, the motion is premature and the court will not entertain it, or if it does, will deny it.

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Post them here, we'll take a look. Production of documents is most important, the rest doesn't get you much. People tend to ask questions that have no bearing on the case or ask for privileged information. "How much did you pay the OC for my account" is one example.

You need to post more info.....how much, small claims or superior court, the complaint, etc. Discovery rules vary from one court level to the next.

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