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collection for already paid bills


cresset2000
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My wife health insurance company sent her a bill for unpaid co-pays for doctor office visits. She called them back telling them that see paid all her co-pays in full in the doctor's office. She sent to insurance copy of the receipts and was told that they will take care of that.

Few months later, she got a bill again. She called insurance company, said them that she sent them copy of receipts and they promised to take care of it. Insurance rep. told her that they did not have on file those receipts, she sent them. She sent them again, after they asked for that. She called them to see if they got fax and they said they received it and will take care of that.

Few months later she got 3rd bill and the story repeats again.

Yesterday, she got letter from collection agency. They are trying to collect $75 + interest. My wife called her insurance and they told her she should contact collection agency. She called to collection agency and sent copy of receipts. She called them again today to follow up and collection agency said that they can not take those receipts because SHE MADE THEM UP AND THEY ARE FAKE.

Can anyone give a good advise what to do next?

P.S. all bills were paid with a credit card and all those transactions can be seen on credit card statements.

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You're the kind of guy I like...it sounds like you have a great deal of documentation.

I would take your credit card statement and black out all information that is non-pertinent or sensitive. They don't need to be in your business. Obviously, things like the account number should be blacked out. Just highlight the payments.

They should correlate with the physical receipts.

Just to be clear, the insurance company is the ones wanting the co-pay money and turned it over to collections...not the doctor's office? Perhaps the doctor's office collected the copay but has failed to reimburse the insurance group.

Regardless you seem to have all the connecting pieces and you are acting quickly, so you are in the catbird seat. The first letter sent from the CA (Collection Agency) is commonly referred to here as a dunning letter. That letter, if it is correctly written, should give you the opportunity to seek validation of the debt within 30 days. It should also state this is debt collector seeking collection of a debt. If that is not the case then this is a violation of the FDCPA (Fair Debt Collection Practices Act).

Don't bother calling the CA. You might as well spit directly into the wind. These minimum wage phone jockeys are trained only to collect money, no matter how convincing and sensible your story is. All that matters now is what is in writing for both them and you. There are examples of debt validation letters on this site. You are going to have to write one.

Sample Letter 9 - Requesting a Collection Agency to Validate a Debt

If you request validation within 30 days of receiving the dunning letter, then no further action (including putting this account on your credit report) can occur until the debt is validated. You should also send copies of all appropriate receipts and materials you have which support your claim. Send this information Certified Mail Return Receipt Requested (CMRRR).

You should also request all responses from the CA are likewise received via mail and request no further contact via phone (unless you like talking to them for some twisted reason).

You will likely not hear from them again. If you do, it will be with a flimsy validation response claiming you still owe money. If they then put a tradeline entry on your credit report I would send an Intent To Sue (ITS) letter (again CMRRR). ITS letters are also available on this site.

If they are unresponsive I would file a complaint in my local small claims court and plead my case (with all supporting evidence) before a judge or magistrate.

Edited by GrumpyGus
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You're the kind of guy I like...it sounds like you have a great deal of documentation.

I would take your credit card statement and black out all information that is non-pertinent or sensitive. They don't need to be in your business. Obviously, things like the account number should be blacked out. Just highlight the payments.

They should correlate with the physical receipts.

Just to be clear, the insurance company is the ones wanting the co-pay money and turned it over to collections...not the doctor's office? Perhaps the doctor's office collected the copay but has failed to reimburse the insurance group.

Regardless you seem to have all the connecting pieces and you are acting quickly, so you are in the catbird seat. The first letter sent from the CA (Collection Agency) is commonly referred to here as a dunning letter. That letter, if it is correctly written, should give you the opportunity to seek validation of the debt within 30 days. It should also state this is debt collector seeking collection of a debt. If that is not the case then this is a violation of the FDCPA (Fair Debt Collection Practices Act).

Don't bother calling the CA. You might as well spit directly into the wind. These minimum wage phone jockeys are trained only to collect money, no matter how convincing and sensible your story is. All that matters now is what is in writing for both them and you. There are examples of debt validation letters on this site. You are going to have to write one.

Sample Letter 9 - Requesting a Collection Agency to Validate a Debt

If you request validation within 30 days of receiving the dunning letter, then no further action (including putting this account on your credit report) can occur until the debt is validated. You should also send copies of all appropriate receipts and materials you have which support your claim. Send this information Certified Mail Return Receipt Requested (CMRRR).

You should also request all responses from the CA are likewise received via mail and request no further contact via phone (unless you like talking to them for some twisted reason).

You will likely not hear from them again. If you do, it will be with a flimsy validation response claiming you still owe money. If they then put a tradeline entry on your credit report I would send an Intent To Sue (ITS) letter (again CMRRR). ITS letters are also available on this site.

If they are unresponsive I would file a complaint in my local small claims court and plead my case (with all supporting evidence) before a judge or magistrate.

The information requested in that letter is not necessary to validate a debt according to the FDCPA.

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True, I just used the first example link on the website. This one is more to the point. I have found the "validation" responses from CAs (when received) to be lacking. Regardless, it is the first step in the process. This letter implies you did not receive a dunning letter but uncovered this on your credit report. You would have to modify it in order to meet your needs. As indicated elsewhere, you shouldn't just cut and paste but use it as a guide in crafting your own version.

Sample letter 10 - Shorter Debt Validation Letter to Send to a Collection Agency

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True, I just used the first example link on the website. This one is more to the point. I have found the "validation" responses from CAs (when received) to be lacking. Regardless, it is the first step in the process. This letter implies you did not receive a dunning letter but uncovered this on your credit report. You would have to modify it in order to meet your needs. As indicated elsewhere, you shouldn't just cut and paste but use it as a guide in crafting your own version.

Sample letter 10 - Shorter Debt Validation Letter to Send to a Collection Agency

That's a better letter. Requesting information not required by the FDCPA simply tells a CA or JDB that you haven't researched and don't know the law.

I have found the "validation" responses from CAs (when received) to be lacking.

Unfortunately, what we would like to receive and what is required may be 2 different things.

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True, I just used the first example link on the website. This one is more to the point. I have found the "validation" responses from CAs (when received) to be lacking. Regardless, it is the first step in the process. This letter implies you did not receive a dunning letter but uncovered this on your credit report. You would have to modify it in order to meet your needs. As indicated elsewhere, you shouldn't just cut and paste but use it as a guide in crafting your own version.

Sample letter 10 - Shorter Debt Validation Letter to Send to a Collection Agency

That's a better letter. Requesting information not required by the FDCPA simply tells a CA or JDB that you haven't researched and don't know the law.

I have found the "validation" responses from CAs (when received) to be lacking.

Unfortunately, what we think should be considered proper validation and what is required by law may be 2 different things.

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Why is an Insurance Company billing her for unpaid copays? Since the Insurance Company doesn't pay the copay anyway, they would have no reason to do this - it would have to be the doctor.

In essence the Insurance company is demanding that she pay them money they didn't pay out in the first place.

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She called to collection agency and sent copy of receipts. She called them again today to follow up and collection agency said that they can not take those receipts because SHE MADE THEM UP AND THEY ARE FAKE.

Now what would give them that idea? Oh wait, people have told them about their fake accounts they try to collect?

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Look at the letter. As my brother Flying Fir says, it has to be the medical provider who says sh eowes the money. If it isn't a co-pay, it might be sometung the insurance copany kicked back to teh provider? Anyway, you have to find it out.

I didn't look at Gus' letters, but I think you do best by simply referencing FDCPA Validation request and tell them you dispute the debt and deny liability and demand they validate it. The n tell them why your wife doesn't owe it. Send it by first class certified mail. Forget teh green card, you can look up the certification nline. You just want to be able to show you mailed the letter and they got it. Who signs for it means nothing.

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Now what would give them that idea? Oh wait, people have told them about their fake accounts they try to collect?

My wife was just speachless:shock:

Look at the letter. As my brother Flying Fir says, it has to be the medical provider who says sh eowes the money. If it isn't a co-pay, it might be sometung the insurance copany kicked back to teh provider? Anyway, you have to find it out.

This is health network like Kaiser, provider and insurance.

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