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Why judges often hate to see Pro Se litigants walk into the courtroom


usagi555
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This is just an example. A woman filed a complaint against Citibank and its collection attorneys. It is unclear whether or not she is alleging that Citibank is subject to the FDCPA, and there are some other glaring errors:

http://www.archive.org/download/gov.uscourts.flnd.63018/gov.uscourts.flnd.63018.3.0.pdf

You don't have to read the whole thing. Just scroll down to the end for her prayer for relief, then remember that this is a civil action. Ultimately, the court allowed her to dismiss her claims against Citibank. I am unaware of what has happened regarding the remaining claims against the law firm.

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There is just something about all banking culture that automatically is diametrically opposed to consumer relations. At some point or another every customer will be opposed to a new policy, interest trend, or the way they handle your safety deposit box always something. Nothing ticks people off more than having their money or finances screwed with.

That said:

Can you imagine a fiery mad Latin tempered little old lady with nothing but time on her hands, a vindictive mindset, the ability to write, and filling up the legal gristmill by generating tons of paper and a attitude. A Lucile Ball comes to mind.

The Court will have to throw her something to calm her down. Go Get Them!!

HP

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Coltfan,

I can feel the angst all the way up here in Oregon.

There is some good research on her complaint. Must know something about the workings of the system.

HP

She asked for criminal penalties in a civil case. That's pretty much like saying 2+2=5 for vary large values of 2.

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there are no words

I believe she used them all up... :lol:

You go girl, drown them in paperwork. It was a chore reading all that.
I learned a long time ago, if you cannot tell the truth, baffle them with bullS*i*!

I think she did both....

BTW She forgot to include the kitchen sink! :shock:

Who would know?? She could have hidden that in between all that "stuff"....

Looks solid, but I would have thrown in loss of consortium as well.

Hey, good credit is sexy!

:D

::Chasey:: ::Chasey:: ::Chasey::

:roflmao::roflmao::roflmao: I've been wanting to use that smiley!!

Can you imagine a fiery mad Latin tempered little old lady with nothing but time on her hands, a vindictive mindset, the ability to write, and filling up the legal gristmill by generating tons of paper and a attitude. A Lucile Ball comes to mind.

The Court will have to throw her something to calm her down. Go Get Them!!

HP

I'd say the court clerks are having a wonderful chuckle over all of her filings with their court...

There is some good research on her complaint. Must know something about the workings of the system.
She asked for criminal penalties in a civil case. That's pretty much like saying 2+2=5 for vary large values of 2.

I had to do a double take at the end too.... I was thinking "eh? criminal in a civil? HUH!?!?!":dunno2: Lord love her for trying....

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There is some good research on her complaint. Must know something about the workings of the system.
I agree. It wasn't completely off base. The criminal count was kind of funny, but I was generally impressed. It takes the next level of understanding to actually prove the case in court.
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I agree. It wasn't completely off base. The criminal count was kind of funny, but I was generally impressed. It takes the next level of understanding to actually prove the case in court.

I think the sad thing is, she probably does have some legitimate FDCPA claims, and she's going to get hosed because she has some rather large gaps in her understanding of our system. Some people can handle it pro se. Others really ought to find a lawyer.

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If only you could ask for a term of imprisonment against a junk debt buyer (which I realize Citi is not). Of course that would mean the reverse, that a creditor could ask for jail terms for non-payment.

If you have enough evidence, you already can ask for a term of imprisonment. You can go to your DA's, AG's or if appropriate, US Attorney's office and let them know that some criminal activities are going on. Of course, if they decided to act, there probably wouldn't be much more than a civil penalty, but that's the legitimate way to ask for criminal penalties.

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There is a lot of humor in this action and misguidance. I'm sure that considerable work hours were spent compiling information and the frustration of dealing with the creditor.

What I've noticed is how carefully the term "Fraud" gets it's own vocabulary, never gets directly stated, and appears to be a legal faux pas to talk about or mention in most non criminal actions. By calling a spade a spade, within the court system, kind of brings the fact back to a nice prospective.

"Your Honor, the bank manager is a crook, he needs jail time for the 32% usury interest charges. Here is my complaint for the fraud against me". Judge - Take him away, Case dismissed. Judgement Plaintiff.

It's the story they write books about!

HP

Edited by Huey Pilot
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