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Debtor friendly banking locations


IllPayOnMyTerms
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What states, if any, do not participate in the Uniform Enforcement of Foreign Judgments Act?

I'm looking for states that make it burdensome for a collector with a judgment to levy the bank account if the judgment originated in another state. Thanks!

Don't quote me but I think I've read texas is one. But can't be 100%

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Pretty much all the states have a mechanism to get sister state judgments enforced.

I'm sure your right, however I've heard that some states have mechanisms requiring the creditor to submit paperwork with the courts and go through a long process before they can levy the bank account. The debtor will be tipped off to what the creditor is doing and can react before the money is seized.

Anyone know which states are more debtor friendly in this regard?

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What states, if any, do not participate in the Uniform Enforcement of Foreign Judgments Act?

I'm looking for states that make it burdensome for a collector with a judgment to levy the bank account if the judgment originated in another state. Thanks!

Probably none. This law is simply a codification of Article IV Section 1 of the US Constitution, so any State erecting barriers to the enforcement of the acts of another would be unconstitutional.

Your best defense is to make your bank account as hard to find as possible.

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Probably none. This law is simply a codification of Article IV Section 1 of the US Constitution, so any State erecting barriers to the enforcement of the acts of another would be unconstitutional.

Your best defense is to make your bank account as hard to find as possible.

Good to see you over here, FlyingIFR, but wondering what happened to that board. :) It's been down all day. Hope it hasn't gone the way of AOC!

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Probably none. This law is simply a codification of Article IV Section 1 of the US Constitution, so any State erecting barriers to the enforcement of the acts of another would be unconstitutional.

Your best defense is to make your bank account as hard to find as possible.

So how does one go about that? How to creditors find bank accounts in the first place?

Would it be effective to open an account in a state you don't live in, travel to, or do business in?

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Generally, a judgment creditor will blanket the big 3 banks with writs - Wells, Chase, BofA. I read that those banks have about 90% of the country's deposits.

If they strike out there, they progress to any financial institution near your home or work. If they strike out there, they either give up, or haul you in for a debtor exam.

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Generally, a judgment creditor will blanket the big 3 banks with writs - Wells, Chase, BofA. I read that those banks have about 90% of the country's deposits.

If they strike out there, they progress to any financial institution near your home or work. If they strike out there, they either give up, or haul you in for a debtor exam.

Wow, 90%? I guess that makes sense. I guess people should get an account with Timbuktu National Credit Union.

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Thanks for the posts everyone.

I think I'll leave my account open with Wells and just keep a little bit of money there to throw them off the trail. They can seize it and feel that they've "got me."

If they don't know about, and don't put me under oath to answer about my account at Timbuktu National Credit Union then I doubt they'll ever find it.

Obviously I won't be conducting any transactions that could possibly link the two accounts. Just using postal money orders and cash should do the trick.

Hopefully they'll eventually get tired and want to settle for a discount.

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