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A "credit check" is a coupon....


machinebike
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A coupon of credit. A 'coupon' is a detachable part of a Certificate.

So when a reserve branch of the Fed Reserve does a credit check, they "check" to see if you have available credit.

This available credit comes from a Certificate.

We need to learn about the Certificate.

Note: I found definition info in Burtons legal thesaurus.

Ive learned from a bank manager a 'credit check' not only checks your payment history but also literally, your available credit. If you have available credit, it has to come from somewhere...so with the above definitions, I believe a key to this understanding concerning our credit, lies within the Certificate.

What Certificate do you know of that links to you?

Edited by machinebike
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A coupon of credit. A 'coupon' is a detachable part of a Certificate.

So when a reserve branch of the Fed Reserve does a credit check, they "check" to see if you have available credit.

This available credit comes from a Certificate.

We need to learn about the Certificate.

Note: I found definition info in Burtons legal thesaurus.

Ive learned from a bank manager a 'credit check' not only checks your payment history but also literally, your available credit. If you have available credit, it has to come from somewhere...so with the above definitions, I believe a key to this understanding concerning our credit, lies within the Certificate.

What Certificate do you know of that links to you?

You have a serious comprehensive functionality problem within your brain and you need it CHECKed out with a neurologist. Perhaps you can find a COUPON for the neurologist with a google search.

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He thinks he's stumbled onto a "revelation" that no one's ever heard of before. It's something that's been floating around for years.

Well I've never heard it before, but after 2 posts, I can see why it's been floating around for years. Maybe it's time for a flush...

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Are you referring the theory that the government uses birth certificates to create fictitious entities, that somehow the government uses them to make a profit which is kept in a secret trust in each of our names, and perhaps our credit comes from that secret trust?

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A coupon of credit. A 'coupon' is a detachable part of a Certificate.

So when a reserve branch of the Fed Reserve does a credit check, they "check" to see if you have available credit.

This available credit comes from a Certificate.

We need to learn about the Certificate.

Nope. CREDIT CHECK in this case is not the definition ou're trying to get, sorry. Which one of these other definitions are you going to try next?

check - definition of check by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

Let's go with number 4:

The act or an instance of inspecting or testing, as for accuracy or quality; examination
A credit check on you would be inspecting your credit history. But you know that.:rolleyes:

Note: I found definition info in Burtons legal thesaurus.

Ive learned from a bank manager a 'credit check' not only checks your payment history but also literally, your available credit. If you have available credit, it has to come from somewhere...so with the above definitions, I believe a key to this understanding concerning our credit, lies within the Certificate.

Wait...you actually had to "learn" from a bank manager that a credit check also looks at your available credit? NO WAY!!!

So which of the above definitions of "check" did you use when you said "...not only checks your payment history"...hmm?

edit - this train wreck needs to go no further.

:trainwreck:

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