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Having had a few years experience with this JDB, I am seeing a pattern in their operations.

 

They have a network of attorneys around the country.  These attorneys are franchisees of the CACH outfit.

 

Each attorney apparently only gets an account for about a year.  Then, if they don't get results by then (and they don't with me), the account is sent to another attorney's office, again, for a year.

 

This cycle keeps repeating.   For one account I have had 6 of their attorneys now.  Even though I beat attorney #2 (the one in my state) in court.

 

Most of them are licensed to practice in only one state, the state their office is located in.

 

The only time to worry is when an attorney licensed in your state gets your account.

 

Always send a DV letter, and state all phone calls are inconvenient, every time a new office gets an account.  I have found that electing arbitration in the DV letter helps.

 

They hate arbitration, as it costs them too much.

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Having had a few years experience with this JDB, I am seeing a pattern in their operations.

 

They have a network of attorneys around the country.  These attorneys are franchisees of the CACH outfit.

 

Each attorney apparently only gets an account for about a year.  Then, if they don't get results by then (and they don't with me), the account is sent to another attorney's office, again, for a year.

 

This cycle keeps repeating.   For one account I have had 6 of their attorneys now.  Even though I beat attorney #2 (the one in my state) in court.

 

Most of them are licensed to practice in only one state, the state their office is located in.

 

The only time to worry is when an attorney licensed in your state gets your account.

 

Always send a DV letter, and state all phone calls are inconvenient, every time a new office gets an account.  I have found that electing arbitration in the DV letter helps.

 

They hate arbitration, as it costs them too much.

 

Actually, the "lawyer" for my case (quotation marks because I don't believe she exists) is licensed in several states. And she has various violation-style cases pending all over the country. I don't know who she is or where she resides permanently, but she's a ghost.

 

CACH is trash and their entire operation is trash.

 

But I agree with you on the other elements of their general MO - they shuffle the case around to different "franchisees" until it ends up in your own state at which point you're sued.

 

I really wish the actual lawyer listed on the case would have to show up to hearings. I don't relish having an actual trial with a rent-a-lawyer. I want to be able to punch that idiot in the face personally instead of having to punch the poor rent-a-lawyer instead.

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I do not feel sorry for the rent-a-lawyer.  They should all know by now what they are getting into when they agree to stand in on a case.

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They are beatable.  

Only question is how bad you want to beat them.   You can name the score with these clowns and you choose when to call off the dogs, if ever.  

 

It's like a non SEC football team in the BCS game.   Not if they will lose, just how ugly the defeat is going to get.

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Aren't they the ones that also use the name - Square Two Financial?

 

I believe Square Two owns Cach.  It might the same as the relationship between Encore Capital and Midland Funding.

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They have two "networks." One is a Partners Network which they described in their SEC filings as "...consists of independent U.S. law firms and attorney-managed collection operations with which we have exclusive franchise relationships." 


They also have a "United Network" which according to their filings says "In addition to our Partners Network, we also utilize certain specialized collection agencies and an extensive network of local law firms that complement the focus and geographic coverage of our Partners Network. Collectively, our Partners Network, certain specialized collection agencies, and local law firms are referred to as our United Network."

 

In case anyone is interested here is a link to their SEC filings http://www.sec.gov/cgi-bin/browse-edgar?action=getcompany&CIK=0001505966&owner=exclude&count=40&hidefilings=0

 

Go down to February of 2012 and you can see their annual report 10-K which describes their operations in more detail. It is rather dry reading and the chance are slim, but who knows, there may be a tidbit or two of information that someone might be able to use in a suit.

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They hate arbitration, as it costs them too much.

I keep hearing this, but want to know how arbitration would cost them MORE than litigating in court? They need a witness at trial (if properly defended) and you could send them discovery (costing them even more). When I fought CACH they wanted arbitration, and tried hard to get me to go with arbitration.

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Yes, they hate arbitration for the reason that it costs almost 100 times more than what they paid for the alleged account.

 

Lets see ;

 

CACH pays 3-5 cents per debt so  $10,000 alleged debt costs around $500 bucks max.

 

JAMS arbitration forum ; First initial cost for the business is $550 , next bill before a teleconference call with arbitrator is around $2000-$5000 and you haven't even begun. Arbitration costs can run between $40K - unlimited amount. JAMS accepts appeal (per terms of contract ) that is done with 3 panel arbitrator each hourly rate is around ($500-800) x3= infinity

AAA will not accept debt collector filing (JDB can not initiate, consumer can file but still case may not be accepted).

AAA has a flat rate cost is still around $2000

 

BTW, when you fought them it must have been prior to NAF debacle (after the 2009 law suit by MN attorney General ) collection industry ran from arbitration.

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Equal and Affordable Justice for All 99% of cases fall into Preferred Class* pricing Single Arbitrator $399 Panel Arbitration $750

Prices are per case, not per person!


 


 

No fee until both sides sign the Arbitration Agreement**
You have our unqualified guarantee!
  It does not matter which side files an arbitration case. Both sides are treated completely equally and the burden of proof for each side is the same.

Hearing Options:
  • Single Arbitrator: This is the most economical option. Having a single arbitrator is just like the typical courtroom allocation of one judge per trial.
  • Panel Arbitration: From the U.S. Supreme Court to the International Olympics, majority panels reduce the possibility of error and bring greater peace of mind as a result. net-ARB's 3-arbitrator panels offer that added assurance at an affordable price! (Panels are required for cases with $10,000 or more in dispute.)
Fee Style Options:
No matter which option you choose, we never charge you until both parties electronically sign the Arbitration Agreement.
  • Pay the entire fee: This is the most expedient option since the other party is not required to pay anything up front. Arbitrators will re-apportion the fee in the decision if both sides agree and make the request during the hearing.
  • Split the fee: The other party will be asked to pay half of the fee during the registration process. Arbitrators will re-apportion the fee in the decision if both sides agree and make the request during the hearing.
After a quick search I found this. I never wanted arbitration, but wondered how people could figure it would cost  as much as they claim. CACH wanted me in arbitration and it was after the NAF which was a complete scam on consumers. There is no way arbitration is going to cost them 40k+. Arbitration requires LESS evidence and NO witness which is why a debt collector would want to arbitrate. I think when people say they filed for arbitration and the bottom feeder dismisses the case because of that fact, the bottom feeder would have dismissed if they wanted to go to trail as well. You would have no way of knowing they dropped because of the arbitration, if you did not try for a trial.
If arbitration has worked for people, then I am glad it did. I believe it is probably just another one of the many "Legal Myths".

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What you posted is JUDICIAL arbitration not CONTRACTUAL which is "per terms of the contract" and what we are referring to here as arbitration!

 

I have been through arbitration, I have seem my opponent's bills here and there (by accident ). Arbitrator bills few thousand dollars to read a one page motion.

 

Hearing  alone is 8 hours x $$$ rate event. Ask for a two days hearing and it's about $10K right there.

 

Hearing could be one hour or 8 doesn't matter, unused hours are non-refundable, consumer fees  capped at $250 , buisness (drafter ) is liable for all fees.

 

Every phone call with arbitrator is about a few grand , not to mention those issues are submitted on paper and another few grand goes to resolving them.

 

You should get the picture by now as to why $40K is a norm, and NO it's not unusal to hit the six figure range.

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What you posted is JUDICIAL arbitration not CONTRACTUAL which is "per terms of the contract" and what we are referring to here as arbitration!

 

I have been through arbitration, I have seem my opponent's bills here and there (by accident ). Arbitrator bills few thousand dollars to read a one page motion.

 

Hearing  alone is 8 hours x $$$ rate event. Ask for a two days hearing and it's about $10K right there.

 

Hearing could be one hour or 8 doesn't matter, unused hours are non-refundable, consumer fees  capped at $250 , buisness (drafter ) is liable for all fees.

 

Every phone call with arbitrator is about a few grand , not to mention those issues are submitted on paper and another few grand goes to resolving them.

 

You should get the picture by now as to why $40K is a norm, and NO it's not unusal to hit the six figure range.

 

This ^^^^^^

 

I'd never do arbitration personally, but you are confusing judicial arbitration with contractural arbitration.    All you have to do is see how hard they fight to find any reason to go back on their arbitation agreements when a consumer turns the table.  

 

I want no part of arbitration, but I've seen many, including howyoucantoo, win using the arbitration strategy.   I've also seen some of the arbtiration bills, and they are insane crazy. 

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I have wiped out four JDBs totalling six figures. 

 

Two went SOL this month, all are litigation barred and I have an attorney who is about to take one of them for FDCPA.(I chose to give it to my  attorney just because he won big for me in another case and I want to show my gratitude). I do all the work collecting violations, I have dates, times, memos, messages, pictures, call logs , all he has to do is file and collect.

 

Keep in mind, if you don't have leverage / violations no matter where you go, you'll lose.

 

I was facing SJ in a very unfriendly pro-creditor court, if it wasn't for arbitration I would be in BK court.

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When I fought CACH in court, they wanted no part of JAMS arbitration, because of the costs.

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I sue once and demanded jury trial, with jury trial it will be hard for any JDB to win. I personally dislike arb cause it might go one sided (they know who pays the bills and it's NOT the consumer), I'll go 1000 times the court way with jury trial, as even if you owe the debt no JDB will have enough paperwork or even a witness that the jury will belive. In fact many lenders got binding arbitration in thier agreements, ATT, Sprint, GEmoneybank, Fingerhut, among others, if these guys got binding arbitration and no class action, you bet is on thier benefit not the consumer, some of them let you opt out of the arbitration provision, within 30-60 days, some don't, I'll always send them the opt out in time, if I sue them it will be in Federal and with a jury trial.

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I sue once and demanded jury trial, with jury trial it will be hard for any JDB to win. I personally dislike arb cause it might go one sided (they know who pays the bills and it's NOT the consumer), I'll go 1000 times the court way with jury trial, as even if you owe the debt no JDB will have enough paperwork or even a witness that the jury will belive. In fact many lenders got binding arbitration in thier agreements, ATT, Sprint, GEmoneybank, Fingerhut, among others, if these guys got binding arbitration and no class action, you bet is on thier benefit not the consumer, some of them let you opt out of the arbitration provision, within 30-60 days, some don't, I'll always send them the opt out in time, if I sue them it will be in Federal and with a jury trial.

I demanded a jury trial too. Even if the bottom feeder has a strong case; they still need a jury that likes bankers, debt collectors, and lawyers (nothing against lawyers), and it's 2 days,  a lot of work, they will need a witness, and it cost them plenty. The lawyer for CACH told me they would accept any type of arbitration or a bench trial, and that a jury trial was unneccessary.

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The lawyer for CACH told me they would accept any type of arbitration or a bench trial, and that a jury trial was unneccessary.

 

Of course it's unneccessary, that's why we're demanding one, you moron.  You think we are going to waltz in here and look for ways to save you time and money? 

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