Christine

Registered agent for Chase Card Services

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I'm trying to find the registered agent for Chase Card Services as it reports incorrect info to Equifax.

 

According to the credit report and a fax I received from Chase Card Services, they are in Delaware (PO box).  But, when I search https://delecorp.delaware.gov/tin/controller I find nothing for "Chase Card Services."

 

Do we sue and serve JP Morgan Chase?  There are only several hundred ...   Or do we just serve at any Chase branch?

 

Thanks for any pointers,

Christine

 

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@Christine

 

Check with the Secretary of State of Delaware.  That office can tell you the name of the registered agent for Chase Bank.

 

Also ask if serving the Secretary of State of DE would suffice as service upon Chase Bank.

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Banks and credit unions are not required to maintain registered agents in any state.

 

Usually you are required to serve a manager, so it is customary to serve the bank's CEO or their general counsel (not a branch manager)

 

If their address is in a different state than yours you usually send your citation and complaint to your state's secretary of state. They have a "citations unit" and will act as the registered agent for the out of state business and will forward it for a fee.

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Thanks, appreciate all the responses.

 

I suppose it's easy enough to drop a copy off at the branch and formally serve Dimon.    Am NOT looking for a default judgment and then Chase appearing and getting it vacated because they're not "Chase Card Services". 

 

Midland Funding is a completely different entity from Midland Credit Management, which is reporting.  Same at Capital One with all its different entities.  Sure wish I could have found Chase Card Services, but it could be a dba for who knows what.

 

Is anyone aware of recent lawsuits against Chase for reporting incorrect recent lates for charged off accounts?  Seems like they do that a lot.

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Search corporations on the SOS's website  to see if Chase has a registered agent in your state.  While they may not be required to have a registered agent, they may have chosen to have one if they have branches in your state.  Then contact the SOS's office to make sure that the agent is the one who would receive service for Chase.

 

In my state, their registered agent is CT Corporation System.

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@Christine

 

No.  It's JPMorgan Chase that has a registered agent in my state.  You could still contact your Secretary of State's office and tell them your situation.  Someone there should have a definitive answer.  If they don't, call the AZ Bar Association to see if someone there would have an answer.

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For JPMorgan Chase I can just serve Dimon.  In my state AZ calling the Bar or SOS would be a complete waste of time.  They would tell me what Chase Card Services told me:  hire an attorney.

 

I'm so surprised that nobody here sued Chase for credit reporting.

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For JPMorgan Chase I can just serve Dimon.  In my state AZ calling the Bar or SOS would be a complete waste of time.  They would tell me what Chase Card Services told me:  hire an attorney.

 

I'm so surprised that nobody here sued Chase for credit reporting.

 

@Christine

 

What did they report on your CR that is causing you to sue them?

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This is actually for a client and Chase reports late payments after it charged off the account and it reports the balance after it sent a 1099.   

 

It so happened that I checked my own credit reports the other day and Chase also reports numerous 120+ day lates after the charge-off, until it sold the account.  I just disputed, but for my client Chase VERIFIED the lates and the balance with Equifax.  Last year I even contacted Chase directly and got a letter stating that they will not remove those late payments.  Since my client has a mortgage deadline, he has to sue.

 

FYI, these incorrect lates are only on Equifax for both of us.  However, Experian refused to investigate the balance dispute despite receiving a copy of the 1099 with the dispute.  So they are also named in the suit.

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Your own case and your client's are different...

 

After an OC sells an account they relinquish control over what is reported. The OC has to report whatever they agreed upon at the time of the sale or what the JDB tells them to report. The assignment probably allows the JDB to modify the tradeline directly. So most likely the JDB is the one who is actually verifying the account.

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You seem a little confused.  It makes NO difference whatsoever who owns the account.  What's important is who REPORTS the account, and that's why I was looking for Chase Card Services.

 

Confused?

 

ROFLMAO    :ROFLMAO2:

 

I beg to differ. Been there. Done that.

 

I had the exact same experience before. In case you didn't notice I have been around for a while.

 

I used to have several accounts with Chase and all of them responded to disputes as expected.

 

The accounts that pulled funny stuff were the ones involving JDBs.

 

You are assuming Chase is the one doing the reporting, but only the owner of an account is allowed to modify or update a tradeline.

 

Back then I didn't have the time or the energy to sue Chase, the JDB and the CRA... which is the best way to get to the truth because otherwise they will blame whoever is not a party to the lawsuit and you won't be able to prove otherwise.

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You are assuming Chase is the one doing the reporting, but only the owner of an account is allowed to modify or update a tradeline.

 

I'm assuming NOTHING.  I just read the credit report.  Do you have a cite for "only the owner of an account is allowed to modify or update a tradeline"

 

I'm sorry if I've been disrespectful, but I don't even know your real name.

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@Christine

 

If an original creditor sells an account and no longer owns it, they cannot update their entry on your credit report.  The reason is because the account no longer belongs to the OC.  The OC no longer has anything to do with the account.

 

Once an account is sold, the only way an OC could change the entry would be to correct inaccurate information. 

 

Also, just because an entry appears on your credit report each month doesn't mean it's being updated each month.  It's allowed to remain there for 7 years.

 

Is Chase updating their entry on your CR each month?  Check the "last reported" date.  If that date changes each month, then they're updating.  That would indicate they haven't sold the account.

 

Does Chase's entry state that the account has been "sold" or "transferred"? 

 

Did you dispute with the CRAs or directly with Chase?

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I'm assuming NOTHING.  I just read the credit report. 

 

You assumed for no good reason whatsoever that the name of the data furnisher was true just because you read it on your report, the same report you are aware is plagued with inaccuracies and false information.

 

CRAs routinely include public records and falsely claim that the data furnisher is the court where the judgment was entered as if courts were in the business of furnishing info to the CRAs.

 

Check out the Credit Reporting Resource Guide (CRRG), which describes in detail the E-Oscar system used by all CRAs. Any data furnisher or processor with an account with the CRAs can send information in which every piece of information in a tradeline is self-reported.

 

So someone can be a JDB and easily report a tradeline for an OC.

 

A third party company that is in the business of reporting info to the CRAs can be a processor for several OCs, JDBs, CAs, etc.

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You assumed for no good reason whatsoever that the name of the data furnisher was true just because you read it on your report, the same report you are aware is plagued with inaccuracies and false information.

 

@cjtx

 

When a company is reported on your CR, it is with good reason to assume that the company is the one furnishing the information;

 

CRAs routinely include public records and falsely claim that the data furnisher is the court where the judgment was entered as if courts were in the business of furnishing info to the CRAs.

 

How do they claim it was provided by the data furnisher?  If it's public record, it can appear in the public record section of your CR.

 

So someone can be a JDB and easily report a tradeline for an OC.

 

While I'm not saying that the above could never happen, I doubt that it happens often (if ever).  If a consumer sued the OC for inaccuracies, what do you think would happen to the JDB when it was found out that the OC wasn't the one furnishing the information? 

 

I seriously doubt that I could have an account with the CRAs but furnish information for another company.   Do you know of a case where a creditor was sued but it was discovered that another business had reported the tradeline for that creditor?

 

1681s-2(a)(8) allows a consumer to dispute an entry directly with the furnisher.  If the tradeline is under the name of a particular company, then that is the company with whom the consumer will dispute.  1692s-2(a)(8) would indicate that the furnisher and the name of the company in the TL are one and the same.

 

1681s-2(b) allows for a private action against the furnisher.  Again, that indicates the furnisher and the name of the entity in the TL are the same.

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When a company is reported on your CR, it is with good reason to assume that the company is the one furnishing the information;

 

 

 

Banks, JDBs, etc. hire processors all the time to do their billing, payment processing and credit reporting. Although furnishers are ultimately responsible for the contents of the report, when you dispute, I wonder who gets contacted by the CRAs to verify the account...

 

This is from CRRG:

 

Whether reporting through a purchased software package, a third-party data processor or an internally developed program, the data furnisher is ultimately responsible for compliance issues.

When reporting information through a third-party processor, there are certain steps that need to be taken to ensure that information is reported according to industry standard guidelines.

 

 

How do they claim it was provided by the data furnisher?  If it's public record, it can appear in the public record section of your CR.

 

After you dispute the information, the CRA will tell you to contact the court as if the court supplied the information instead of one of the data marketing companies that mines public records. Those companies sometimes make mistakes but the CRA won't disclose their name and you can't hold them accountable for ruining your credit.

 

If a consumer sued the OC for inaccuracies, what do you think would happen to the JDB when it was found out that the OC wasn't the one furnishing the information?

 

Most likely there is an indemnity clause in their agreement which can be settled out of court in arbitration.

 

 

I seriously doubt that I could have an account with the CRAs but furnish information for another company.   Do you know of a case where a creditor was sued but it was discovered that another business had reported the tradeline for that creditor?

 

Furnishing info for other companies is what third party processors do.

 

1681s-2(b) allows for a private action against the furnisher.  Again, that indicates the furnisher and the name of the entity in the TL are the same.

 

After you dispute with the CRA, the CRA is required to contact the data furnisher. That's what triggers your private right of action against a data furnisher. So one would assume that's what CRAs actually do in order to comply with the law. However, when you request MOV and the name, address and telephone number of the person they contacted to verify the info, the CRA will come up with a lot of generalities, and ambiguities like it's an electronic process, blah blah blah... and it won't tell you what you are assuming should be the data furnisher's info. Why???

 

Simple, because someone other than the data furnisher is being contacted.

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Banks, JDBs, etc. hire processors all the time to do their billing, payment processing and credit reporting. Although furnishers are ultimately responsible for the contents of the report, when you dispute, I wonder who gets contacted by the CRAs to verify the account..

 

The point is that the named entity is responsible for the information. 

 

You had stated that she assumed that the name of the data furnisher was true just because she read it on the report.  It doesn't matter if a company hires a processor to do the reporting for them.  The company who is named in the TL and who has hired the processor is still the furnisher under the FCRA.

 

After you dispute the information, the CRA will tell you to contact the court as if the court supplied the information instead of one of the data marketing companies that mines public records. Those companies sometimes make mistakes but the CRA won't disclose their name and you can't hold them accountable for ruining your credit.

 

Yes, some people might assume the court would have provided the information, but that's merely based upon their lack of knowledge.  After a little research, one understands that public record is just that...public record.  If the information in that section is proven to be incorrect and the CRA won't correct it, you then sue the CRA. 

 

Most likely there is an indemnity clause in their agreement which can be settled out of court in arbitration.

 

An indemnity clause in whose agreement?   Are you saying an OC would have an agreement with a JDB to allow the JDB to report under the OC's name?

 

 

Furnishing info for other companies is what third party processors do.

 

 

You're missing the point.  You said a JDB could report for an OC.  A JDB is not a 3rd party processor.  They are in the business of buying debts.  They are not in the business of reporting TLs for other companies.

 

 

After you dispute with the CRA, the CRA is required to contact the data furnisher. That's what triggers your private right of action against a data furnisher. So one would assume that's what CRAs actually do in order to comply with the law. However, when you request MOV and the name, address and telephone number of the person they contacted to verify the info, the CRA will come up with a lot of generalities, and ambiguities like it's an electronic process, blah blah blah... and it won't tell you what you are assuming should be the data furnisher's info. Why???

 

Simple, because someone other than the data furnisher is being contacted.

 

 

If a 3rd party processor is reporting for the company named in the TL, the processor would have to be authorized to do so by that company.  Ultimately, the named company is responsible for the information being provided. 

 

You can't just report TLs for companies unless you're authorized by those companies.

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Thank you, BV80, I've been too busy to argue these points.  It never ceases to amaze me how people get on these free public forums and claim to be experts when they really don't have a clue and their claims are based on assumptions instead of experience.  Thanks again.

 

FYI, CRAs always provided me with the printouts of investigations and responses as soon as we entered the discovery process.

 

Once I catch up I'll post the screenshots of the CHASE CARD SERVICES reporting.

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You can't just report TLs for companies unless you're authorized by those companies.

 

You can't? It happens all the time. The system does not prevent anyone from doing it.

Once you buy the account you have the right to control what's reported about it.

 

 

 

 It never ceases to amaze me how people get on these free public forums and claim to be experts when they really don't have a clue and their claims are based on assumptions instead of experience. 

 

 

Great attitude coming from someone who had no clue whatsoever as to how to serve an OC.

Good luck to you!

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You can't? It happens all the time. The system does not prevent anyone from doing it.

Once you buy the account you have the right to control what's reported about it.

 

 

Show me a case where JDBs report TLs in the name of the OC.  They cannot legally do it.  A updated TL for an OC would indicate the OC owns the account.  If the OC has sold the account, such a TL would be deceptive and illegal.

 

Just because you own the account does not mean you can report anything you choose.  The FCRA is pretty clear about that.

 

Great attitude coming from someone who had no clue whatsoever as to how to serve an OC.

 

Not knowing who to serve merely means one has never sued an OC before.  It has nothing to do with one's knowledge or lack thereof about other topics.

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