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Finally taking the plunge!


Guest usctrojanalum
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Guest usctrojanalum

So I've decided I am going to apply to law school for the Fall 2014/Spring 2015 semesters.  I graduated college in 2008 and didn't apply to law school immediately because of thought of adding on more educational debt was terrifying.  I'm at a better place in my life now where I've eliminated all my credit card/loan debt.

 

I registered with LSAC.org today and have registered for the February LSAT.  I hope to put in about 200 hours studying for the exam over the next six months, including taking a LSAT review class at St John's University starting in December.

 

With that, my time here is going to become extremely limited.  I'll try to pop in and say Hi when I can and I'd like to update you all of my progress along the way.

 

Cheers,

 

And talk to you soon

 

David

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congrats!  Are you going to be a consumer attorney? ;)  I think there is better money in business firms, I have a cousin who is doing quite well in california, was named rising star for 4 years straignt, and now is name super attorney for 2 years straight. (whatever that means, something prestigeous, lol)  He does business and corporate law.

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Guest usctrojanalum

Honestly, I'm not sure yet.  I've worked for various attorneys since I was 14 years old, so I have plenty of connections in obtaining a job out once I am admitted.  None of them do consumer law.  I might be leaning towards criminal defense, that was my favorite job over the past 12 years and I have a really good relationship with the firm owner.

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Guest usctrojanalum

Thanks everyone.  I'm nervous and excited.  I've been reading a bunch of law school/LSAT prep forums and apparently the further away you are (in years) from your undergraduate degree the less important your GPA becomes and the more important your LSAT score is.  The amount of pressure that gets put on you for a single 4 hour exam is excruciating.

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Just a word of advice if I may. Don't put too much stock into those discussion boards about LSAT, law school, whatever. Most of them are about as far from "the way is really is" as  you can get, and seem to be frequently mostly by folks who, well, probably won't be joining you in law school.

 

You probably already know, LSAT has nothing to do with the law. It tests your reading comprehension, logical thinking ability, and of course, ability to perform under stress. Don't give it any more credit than it deserves. If  you haven't done so already, I think you can go to the LSAC site, where they have charts that show your relative admission chances to various schools based upon GPA and LSAT. You'll need some good reference letters, too. Good references will go a long way.

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I wish you well, and references to matter, i.e., the lawyers you worked for and it really helps if you can get a judge or two to write a letter on your behalf.  I knew a  young lady with average grades and average LSAT who was rejected by U of Ala Law School, but after she got two state judges to write letters of recommendation, she was admitted.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Thanks everyone.  I'm nervous and excited.  I've been reading a bunch of law school/LSAT prep forums and apparently the further away you are (in years) from your undergraduate degree the less important your GPA becomes and the more important your LSAT score is.  The amount of pressure that gets put on you for a single 4 hour exam is excruciating.

 

 

Congrats.  It is exciting to make the decision.

 

I sat on the admissions committee at my law school for at least one year and if my experience is common, you will have some advantages already.  Most schools want a diverse class of first years and taking time between college and law school really helps.  Especially since you have demonstrated an interest by working in the field.

 

But the LSAT does matter.  Probably shouldn't but it does.  The classes really help a lot but I recommend doing as many practice exams as you can.  It is really all about figuring out the test and the practice exams help.

 

Good luck.

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