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I had a corporate credit card and a corporate credit line in my name from Capital One that the company I owned stopped paying in 2009 when the business closed. I hadn't heard a peep from Capital One for several years even at the old address until I was forwarded a regular letter sent via USPS from a judge. The letter wasn't sent registered or in any special way.  How does the judge even know I received this letter?   The letter informed me I'm being sued by Capital One. The statute of limitations in the state where the company was located is 6 years.  I now live and work in a different state with a limitation of 3 years.  The statute of limitations would be expired in my current state of residency.  Can Capital One sue me in my old state?

 

I would like to know which corporate debt is referenced in the lawsuit.  Do I give up any rights by contacting the clerk and asking for details?  How much information if any should I give the clerk? 

 

Does anyone have settlement experience on a corporate account being settled personally by Capital One?  What percentage and length of payments should I target?

 

I'm leaning towards hiring a lawyer to represent me. When I do, do I hire a lawyer for the area where I'm being sued or from the area where I currently live and work?

 

If I do need to hire an attorney, how is the best way to source one in the metro Atlanta area? I want a fighter. I could make settlement offers without an attorney.

 

 

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Yes - you generally be sued in the state in which you presently live or where the debt was incurred. 

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I had a corporate credit card and a corporate credit line in my name from Capital One that the company I owned stopped paying in 2009 when the business closed. I hadn't heard a peep from Capital One for several years even at the old address until I was forwarded a regular letter sent via USPS from a judge. The letter wasn't sent registered or in any special way.  How does the judge even know I received this letter?   The letter informed me I'm being sued by Capital One. The statute of limitations in the state where the company was located is 6 years.  I now live and work in a different state with a limitation of 3 years.  The statute of limitations would be expired in my current state of residency.  Can Capital One sue me in my old state?

 

I would like to know which corporate debt is referenced in the lawsuit.  Do I give up any rights by contacting the clerk and asking for details?  How much information if any should I give the clerk? 

 

Does anyone have settlement experience on a corporate account being settled personally by Capital One?  What percentage and length of payments should I target?

 

I'm leaning towards hiring a lawyer to represent me. When I do, do I hire a lawyer for the area where I'm being sued or from the area where I currently live and work?

 

If I do need to hire an attorney, how is the best way to source one in the metro Atlanta area? I want a fighter. I could make settlement offers without an attorney.

 

 

The BEST consumer law firm in GA and one of the best in country, located in Atlanta.  I have used them.  They are excellent and very pleasant to work with.

http://www.skaarandfeagle.com

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