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GDayMateAZ

What font do you use ? If it's "Times New Roman 12", please read this ...

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I always typed my legal papers using "Times New Roman 12" (TNR12) without any thought how Judges 

would enjoy reading them ...

 

Just recently I discovered this site

http://typographyforlawyers.com/a-brief-history-of-times-new-roman.html

that explains why TNR is not so good for our most important readers, Judges...

 

Most courts' rules do not specify any fonts requirements; they require only font's size to not be less than 12.

 

Only 7th Court gives such recomendations in

http://www.ca7.uscourts.gov/rules/type.pdf:

 

"The Times of London chose the typeface Times New Roman to serve an audience looking for a

quick read. Lawyers don’t want their audience to read fast and throw the
document away; they want to maximize retention.
Achieving that goal requires
a different approach—different typefaces, different column widths, different
writing conventions. Briefs are like books rather than newspapers. The
most important piece of advice we can offer is this: read some good books and
try to make your briefs more like them."

 

"Use typefaces that were designed for books. Both the Supreme Court and

the Solicitor General use Century. Professional typographers set books in
New Baskerville, Book Antiqua, Calisto, Century, Century Schoolbook,
Bookman Old Style and many other proportionally spaced serif faces. Any
face with the word “book” in its name is likely to be good for legal work."

 

So, I'm using now "Century Schoolbook" 12 which is one of standard MS Word fonts

and it's FREE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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But, sometimes, they do :-)

 

I know, I was just having a little fun.   ;-)

 

Your post is well taken, and I also made the same error originally using Times New Roman 12 in my filings. I switched to Courier 14 point which seems to be the preferred font for my state and county. I think it's a good suggestion by GDayMateAZ to locate what the standard is for any pro se's jurisdiction so filings look more professional. The party reviewing them will appreciate you took the time to conform with local standards.

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Couple days ago I bought a new laptop with Windows 8.1 (for cheap, thanks to Microsoft haters) and Office 2013.

Century Schoolbook font was not in the list of Office 2013 fonts

while it was in the Office 2010 list.

The issue was resolved by copying this font from Win 7/Office 2010 machine (that was also licensed to me).

 

Do you guys see here any legal issue ?

Edited by GDayMateAZ

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After reading this post I would replace my Times new roman 12 setting to Century Schoolbook 12. Also,   just for the record judges do ::read::

 

The Judges of Higher Courts are reading, anyway.

 

And all papers you submit them must be double spaced

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I used Century Schoolbook roman font for COA And California Supreme Court petitions. The clerks at both said mine were "refreshingly well organized, and appeared very professionally. The California Supreme Court took an additional 30 days to decide if they were to review. I can only gleen it was because of my best foot forward efforts. I also read the wordsmith article and it helped at work also.

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I actually used Arial on my Answer last year.

Arial is more readable than Times New Roman but consumes more paper: the

text takes two pages on TNR 12 and three pages on Arial 12.

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Arial is more readable than Times New Roman but consumes more paper: the

text takes two pages on TNR 12 and three pages on Arial 12.

I had it set to 10 rather than 12. The only Century font I have is Century Schoolbook L and it takes a bit more paper than Arial at the same size. Just a few lines more. The court clerk actually thought that a lawyer had done my answer. It probably would not have passed the same muster if it had gone before the Justice however.

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I had it set to 10 rather than 12. The only Century font I have is Century Schoolbook L and it takes a bit more paper than Arial at the same size. Just a few lines more. The court clerk actually thought that a lawyer had done my answer. It probably would not have passed the same muster if it had gone before the Justice however.

 

Basically, speaking for older people like Judges, fonts 10 are readable well.

 

In AZ Justice Courts have no special rules for fonts, but AZ JCRCP (effective since 01/01/2013) require size no less than 12.

 

Superior Court Rules require double spacing and (I believe so) size no less than 12.

 

If your docs are not readable, they would be returned back to you or Judge would just skip them.

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I find this funny, because I am in Grad School and my work has to be done in APA format with Times New Roman 12 point black font.  I have lost point because a MS to Mac Word conversion changed the font to a dark grey in my header, which appears lighter than the paper to show it is part of the header so I didn't notice the non-black font!  My first letters to CAs disputing ID theft inquiries were done in TNR12, will definitely change going forward!

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