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Determined1

The Lawyer’s Apprentice - How to Learn the Law Without Law School

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Great NY Times article on how to become a lawyer's apprentice, and then a lawyer in many states without going to law school.  A fascinating part of the story is, John Adams, Chief Justice Marshall, Abraham Lincoln and Thomas Jefferson never went to law school. They all learned the law as a "lawyer's apprentice." 

 

Please see:  http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/03/education/edlife/how-to-learn-the-law-without-law-school.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&version=Moth-Visible&module=inside-nyt-region&region=inside-nyt-region&WT.nav=inside-nyt-region&_r=0

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Great NY Times article on how to become a lawyer's apprentice, and then a lawyer in many states without going to law school.  A fascinating part of the story is, John Adams, Chief Justice Marshall, Abraham Lincoln and Thomas Jefferson never went to law school. They all learned the law as a "lawyer's apprentice." 

 

Please see:  http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/03/education/edlife/how-to-learn-the-law-without-law-school.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&version=Moth-Visible&module=inside-nyt-region&region=inside-nyt-region&WT.nav=inside-nyt-region&_r=0

That's a very interesting post.  I knew CA had something like that ( I think you can even sit for the CA bar by graduating from certain home-study law schools) but I didn't know other states also had apprenticeship programs.

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In California, you can do this:

"You can meet California’s legal education requirements by spending at least four years studying law under the personal supervision of a California judge of record or a California attorney in his or her law office."

You can also qualify for the bar exam without attending an accredited law school, or even online (though I believe any online education has to be from a California bar recognized "distance learning" institution):

"In California, unlike in many other states, you need not study law at an accredited law school in order to take the bar examination. If you decide to study law at an unaccredited or correspondence law school, however, you will have to take and pass the First-Year Law Students’ Examination (see #7)."

(both of the above are from the CA State Bar website)

This guy explains it better than I can in a post: http://tutorials.ehlinelaw.com/become-lawyer-law-degree/

Don't quote me on this, but from what I understand, the caveat is that if you go either of these ways, your license and experience will only ever be of use to you in California, because other states won't certify you unless your education was from a "traditional" accredited law school.

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