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Debt Claim Suit - Filed answer but saw in recent credit report that we did dispute and is listed on credit report as disputed


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We previously responded with a General Denial to a PRA Debt Suit brought on behalf of a Citi/Home Depot account. I couldn't access the credit report until after the time limit and filed a General Denial.

I see on the credit report that we did dispute it over a year ago. 

How does this affect any potential motion or pleas to the court? Is there additional action I should take having this info?

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45 minutes ago, fedupintx said:

The debt was disputed, the credit reporting agency recorded it and nothing happened since that action....

What exactly did you expect to happen after you disputed it?

Disputing it with the bureaus does not obligate the furnisher/creditor to stop reporting or collecting under the FDCPA.  It also doesn't prohibit them filing a suit.

45 minutes ago, fedupintx said:

What do you mean authenticated and how do I do that.

You have to get it proven as a true and accurate credit report that meets the rules of evidence for your court.   While you can do that it won't be of much help in your defense.  

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I don't know how a National Credit Reporting Agency would have anything other than true and accurate? 

It is my understanding that if you disputed an item that is reported, the company that reported to the bureau is notified of the dispute and should respond to the dispute and validate it.  It's all nonsense  and a frivolous waste of time and  resources.  

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45 minutes ago, fedupintx said:

I don't know how a National Credit Reporting Agency would have anything other than true and accurate? 

They only report what is furnished to them by the creditors.  If the creditor provides inaccurate information then the consumer credit report has errors.  That is why you are advised to at least check the report annually.  Human error will always exist not to mention the collection agencies and junk debt buyers attempting to skirt the law.

46 minutes ago, fedupintx said:

It is my understanding that if you disputed an item that is reported, the company that reported to the bureau is notified of the dispute and should respond to the dispute and validate it.

You understand wrong.  If the creditor sends you a dunning letter or calls to collect you have 30 days from their initial contact to dispute the debt and they must cease collection efforts until they validate.  If they choose not to validate (which some do) then they cannot continue to collect.  If they do validate then they can continue collection efforts.  The threshold for validation is so low you can trip over it.  They only have to provide the name/address of the original creditor and the amount they allege you owe to be in compliance.   Except in a few states (like Texas) if you send a dispute to a creditor after 30 days from initial contact they do not have to validate or cease collection activity.

When a consumer disputes a trade line on their credit report the bureau contacts the creditor who supplied the information.  Usually by an electronic system called E-Oscar.  The creditor simply enters the code that corresponds i.e. "yes the debt is valid" etc.  if they do not respond to the bureau then the trade line must be deleted.  There is absolutely no requirement that the creditor validate with the consumer for disputing a trade line with the credit bureau(s) though many will do so anyway.

The courts are divided on whether a trade line on a credit report is "collection activity" and until someone appeals it all the way to SCOTUS there is not a definitive answer.  Regardless if you dispute a trade line on your report there is also no requirement that the creditor delete it until they validate with you.  

51 minutes ago, fedupintx said:

It's all nonsense  and a frivolous waste of time and  resources.

No it isn't.  You simply need to educate yourself thoroughly on the consumer laws regarding collections BEFORE you start the process.  The laws that exist can be quite helpful if you know how to use them properly.

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