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Help w/ medical bill collection


Juan Grande
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I'm hoping someone here can help me. I will try to be as brief as possible but want to make sure I offer up all of the facts. 

I have a collection of about $330 on my credit report that is being pursued by a collection agency. 

Back in 2010 I had excellent medical insurance and had some blood work done for my cholesterol. Usually I paid my $20 co-pay and that's it. I was never made aware of any further charges nor sent a bill.

Fast forward 14 months after the date of service...I get a bill from my insurance company stating I owed an additional $230 something and that if I felt the amount was incorrect and wanted to dispute it I could do so up to 12 months after the date of service. Essentially the dispute period had expired two months before I even received the letter. 

I reached out to the insurance company by mail and, as expected, they sent back some generic rejection letter and stated that I was still responsible for the bill.    

I wrote back again, appealing their decision, and they rejected my request again.

Since then the debt has been turned over to a collection agency who is of no help at all. 

Can any one be of help to me in getting this extortion, err I mean debt, completely erased from my credit report?

I've heard of writing a Cease and Desist letter as the debt may be too old, some have said to sue the debt collector in court???

I don't know what else to do and I really hate to pay the bill as I don't feel I should have ever been responsible for it since I had insurance that should have covered the charges at the time. 

If it's best to pay it, rather than fighting it on principle, someone please tell me.   

If my memory serves me correctly it seemed liked my credit report shows that the collection drops from my credit report in 2017 but who knows if that will ever happen plus I may be buying a house in the meantime and this has already cost me enough on my damaged credit.

Thank you in advance for any and all help. Please be clear in any suggestions you may have as I don't understand a lot of the abbreviations and acronyms used.  

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5 hours ago, Juan Grande said:

I get a bill from my insurance company stating I owed an additional $230 something and that if I felt the amount was incorrect and wanted to dispute it I could do so up to 12 months after the date of service.

Your insurance company would not send you a bill for the care the provider would have to.  Was it an Explanation of Benefits that stated that amount was not covered and your responsibility?  If so, there is typically a code on there explaining why they didn't cover that amount that you owe.  For example:  the test wasn't necessary for your medical issue, you had not met the deductible for lab work, or an out of network facility was used.

5 hours ago, Juan Grande said:

Fast forward 14 months after the date of service...I get a bill from my insurance company stating I owed an additional $230 something and that if I felt the amount was incorrect and wanted to dispute it I could do so up to 12 months after the date of service. Essentially the dispute period had expired two months before I even received the letter. 

You could try making a complaint to your state's Insurance Commissioner and see if they can help but I suspect because this happened 4+ years ago there is not much they can do now.

5 hours ago, Juan Grande said:

Can any one be of help to me in getting this extortion, err I mean debt, completely erased from my credit report?

There is no magical method of erasing a valid trade line from your credit report.  While you may have simply paid a co-pay in the past when "affordable care" came into play many things that were covered before no longer were.  It isn't extortion for the provider to expect to be paid for the care they gave you.

5 hours ago, Juan Grande said:

I've heard of writing a Cease and Desist letter as the debt may be too old, some have said to sue the debt collector in court?

Sue them for what?  It isn't their fault the insurance policy didn't cover your care and you didn't pay what you owed.  A cease and desist letter only means they can't send you collection letters or call.  It does not mean they have to delete the trade line.  

5 hours ago, Juan Grande said:

If it's best to pay it, rather than fighting it on principle, someone please tell me.   

If you want a mortgage right away:  pay it.  You could try disputing it with the bureaus and there is a small chance that the collection agency no longer has the account and can't respond to the bureau and it comes off that way.  If they still have the account and validate it will stay.

5 hours ago, Juan Grande said:

If my memory serves me correctly it seemed liked my credit report shows that the collection drops from my credit report in 2017 but who knows if that will ever happen

It will drop off 7 years from the date you had the lab work done.

 

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19 minutes ago, Clydesmom said:

Your insurance company would not send you a bill for the care the provider would have to.

I think it was a bill from a debt collector as well. I also don't disagree that if you received services commensurate to the amount billed, you should pay for it. On the other hand, if I took my car into the shop for repair and got an invoice from them 14 months later, I would question it. Anyone would. Just because the bill comes from a medical provider doesn't mean its correct and doesn't mean you owe it. @Clydesmom, I know its difficult for you to be objective when it comes to medical debt, but can you suggest something to @Juan Grandethat might help him actually find out what the $230 bill is for, so that he might determine whether he does actually owe it or not? Medical debt collectors are among the most dishonest in the business. If he actually called his insurance company, would they be able to research back that far without having to pull records from archive?

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9 minutes ago, nascar said:

On the other hand, if I took my car into the shop for repair and got an invoice from them 14 months later, I would question it.

I agree but the major problem is his post is quite cryptic and several things need to be clarified.  

10 minutes ago, nascar said:

Just because the bill comes from a medical provider doesn't mean its correct and doesn't mean you owe it.

I don't disagree but far too often what I hear is "what my insurance paid is more than enough" or worse they have no insurance and no intention of paying at all.

11 minutes ago, nascar said:

can you suggest something to @Juan Grandethat might help him actually find out what the $230 bill is for

It would help to know who sent him what and when.  I did suggest to look at the EOB for the codes explaining what the insurance company denied it for.  He is assuming because he only paid a co-pay in the past that this is all he had to do now.  I gave several examples of why he may have received a different bill than in the past.

12 minutes ago, nascar said:

If he actually called his insurance company, would they be able to research back that far without having to pull records from archive?

In the digital era:  yes.  If he got a bill from a collection agency all he needs to do is get a copy of the Explanation of Benefits from the carrier and compare it to the bill.  If they didn't pay there is a code indicating why.  Usually the explanation of what the code means is on the back of the EOB.  As an example:  if the blood test was $600 and he still had $230 remaining on his deductible then the bill the collection agency is sending is valid as to the amount owed.  If they are still in charge of the collection then he can pay them.  If the contracted amount on the blood test is $370 and the provider is in network and trying to balance bill: then that they can't do.  However, if the lab is out of network they can balance bill because they are not under contract for the lower amount.

 

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@Cyldesmom How exactly is my message "quite cryptic"? I stated all the facts. I'm not trying to get out of paying anything that I rightfully should pay and I don't appreciate your accusation. I simply don't want to be extorted for money. There was no explanation of benefits or why I was being held responsible for the charges and the insurance company was of absolutely no helping in explaining why. I appreciate you taking the time to reply but if you can't offer any constructive help as I asked for then please don't respond at all.

These services were in 2010 so they were before affordable care came into play, I believe. 

I got a bill 14 months after the date of service but I only had 12 months after the date of service to contest it, therefore, I lost all my rights by the time I received the bill. "Here's a bill, you can no longer contest it and if you don't pay we're turning it over to a collection agency." Would you want pay that bill and be treated that way? It doesn't seem right to me and the fact that I can't get any one to explain any of it to me is frustrating to say the least. It seems wrong that I could even be responsible for a bill 14 months after the date of service in the first place. 

This was not the first time I had these services done and in the past I was only responsible for my co-pay.  

Can any one tell me if there is a way I can get the credit agency, the debt collector or the medical provider (who turned it over to the collection agency) to remove this from my credit report or is it better to just let it drop off in 10/2017? It showing on 2 of the 3 agencies.   

Thanks again.

 

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Well, there's no clear cut way to make sure it would be removed.  There are things you can try, but if the CA insists on reporting it, it will remain on your reports until the drop-off date.

The real place to start is with the specifics of what actually took place.  Who was the insurance company?  Who was the service provider?  If this applies to the plan you had, was the service provider in-network or out of network?  It makes a difference.  Insurance companies negotiate rates for services with their in-network providers.  It's generally supposed to be that that amount is what will be paid by the insurance.  If the service provider tries to bill you separately for an additional amount, it's known as balance billing, and last I checked, 47 states had laws that made this practice illegal.  But your situation seems to be with the insurance company and not with a service provider.  Calling the insurance company might provide some info, then again, it might not, but it's worth a try IMO.  Getting in touch with your state's insurance commissioner's office might help too.  Maybe it's just me, but I will not pay any old amount that a company tries to bill me for unless it can reasonably be shown that I do owe it.  Too many companies making "errors" or just plain overtly overcharging people, so I would definitely look for proof. 

If you can live with it sitting on your credit for another year and a half, that's up to you.  But if you are looking to buy a house before then, this would likely have to be paid to qualify for a mortgage.  Not necessarily so, but it's a good possibility.

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1 hour ago, kraftykrab said:

Well, there's no clear cut way to make sure it would be removed. 

So true. Even it was paid, a vindictive collector is liable to leave it on as paid collection just to kick more sand in your face. Do you have any correspondence from this debt collector? Who is it that's trying to collect from  you anyway. The identify of the collector might go a long way toward determining how to make them go away.

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@kraftykrab I'm in Calfornia so you may not have heard of the medical provider, Scripps, and my health care was with with Signa, I believe. Both the medical provider and insurance company are both well known companies to me. My services were all in-network. I will try reaching out to the insurance company again to see if someone helpful can get involved and tell me exactly why I was being held responsible for these extra charges. Next, I will reach out to the insurance commissioner and see if they may help. This really seems like an "error" from the billing department at the insurance company and, at the very least, past a statute of limitations for them to be demanding a payment from me for something that occurred 14 months prior. The whole thing seemed fishy to me.

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4 hours ago, Juan Grande said:

@Cyldesmom How exactly is my message "quite cryptic"?

Because you first said the insurance company sent you a bill.  The carrier does not bill you for the care the provider the gave the care does.  Apparently a collection agency sent you a bill 14 months after the service and 2 months after your supposed right to dispute the bill.  You reached out to the insurance carrier and appealed which was denied.

Here is my educated guess as to what happened:

Collection agency billed you.  You appealed to the insurance carrier who still did not pay the bill as you anticipated.  When you didn't pay the provider or the collection agency it landed on your credit report.

4 hours ago, Juan Grande said:

I got a bill 14 months after the date of service but I only had 12 months after the date of service to contest it

If the collection agency sent the bill that way you can file a complaint with the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau.  If it was the provider there is no law that addresses this.  

It doesn't make it right but there is not much recourse especially since it happened several years ago.

4 hours ago, Juan Grande said:

This was not the first time I had these services done and in the past I was only responsible for my co-pay.  

It doesn't mean that there wasn't a change in the plan or a valid reason for there not paying for it.  

4 hours ago, Juan Grande said:

Would you want pay that bill and be treated that way?

No, but I wouldn't have waited 6 years to deal with it either.

4 hours ago, Juan Grande said:

It seems wrong that I could even be responsible for a bill 14 months after the date of service in the first place. 

Insurance does not always move quickly on a claim but in the end if they don't pay you are still responsible for the bill.  There is NOTHING in the financial guarantee you signed when you got the care that says "if your insurance doens't pay don't worry about it you get the care for free"  in fact it says the exact opposite.  If insurance does not cover the charges you agree to pay them in full.

4 hours ago, Juan Grande said:

I appreciate you taking the time to reply but if you can't offer any constructive help as I asked for then please don't respond at all.

I gave you plenty but apparently I need to be CLEARER:

Option 1:  Call the provider and ask for an itemized statement.  At the same time call the insurance carrier and ask for a  copy of the Explanation of Benefits regarding that specific service on that date with that provider.  Compare the two and if the amounts are the same look for the code as to what was paid or not paid and WHY.

Will this remove it from your report?  NO.  However, it tells you how to begin to fight this again and whether or not it can be removed without paying it.

Option 2:  dispute the trade line with the bureaus and see if the collection agency no longer has the account and it gets deleted because they don't respond to the dispute.

Option 3:  Make a written settlement offer of pay for deletion to the collection agency.

Option 4:  wait it out until it falls off next year.

Constructive enough for you?   No one can guarantee you a deletion.

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1 hour ago, Juan Grande said:

@nascar It's some collection agency in the LA area...Progressive Management Systems http://www.pmscollects.com/  From reviews they sound like a typical shady collection company with a bad reputation. 

It is way too late for anyone to legally collect this. You're right PMS is an habitual offender. Don't pay them a penny. Send them a letter (with delivery confirmation) instructing them to cease all contact with you. As @kraftykrabsuggested, if you can live with it a few more months on your credit report, just let it go.

One final note. In this case, whether you received the service or not, you are under no legal obligation to pay anything. People forget- that is what a statute of limitations is for. If a creditor has a claim, the law provides that he cannot sit on it for years, until so much time passes that a consumer can no longer muster a defense to the claim, and then pop out from under whatever rock they've been hiding under and file suit claiming they've been wronged by yet another deadbeat consumer. You should not be made to feel that you're somehow responsible for physician's inept record keeping and billing practices. It may be your responsibility to pay a debt when you receive a timely invoice, but no way is it your responsibility to ensure the efficient operation of his office. @Juan Grande, you've done nothing wrong here, and don't let anyone tell you otherwise.

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23 minutes ago, nascar said:

As @kraftykrabsuggested, if you can live with it a few more months on your credit report, just let it go.

I agree if you can wait let it fall off.  However, if a mortgage is in the immediate future be prepared the underwriters may want it dealt with before doing the mortgage.  I would make certain before you house shop.  If the CA gets wind you want a mortgage the chances of them settling for less are ZERO don't give up your leverage.

25 minutes ago, nascar said:

In this case, whether you received the service or not, you are under no legal obligation to pay anything. People forget- that is what a statute of limitations is for.

That isn't exactly accurate.  Even though the SOL expired to sue the patient/OP for the debt it doesn't make the debt disappear.  The SOL expiring merely means that their legal remedies to collect are severely limited.  Legally the patient got the care and should pay for it but the provider/CA no longer as the courts to enforce it.   Not to mention there are two SOLs one for suing and one for reporting and because the one to sue expired does not mean they have to stop reporting.   In fact many will report and verify to the bitter end after the SOL for suing expires as that is their only weapon.

One more fact to consider that many providers are now resorting to due to patients not paying their bills:  they are refusing any more services until the past balances are paid or discharging the patient from care to seek another provider if they can find one.

31 minutes ago, nascar said:

If a creditor has a claim, the law provides that he cannot sit on it for years, until so much time passes that a consumer can no longer muster a defense to the claim, and then pop out from under whatever rock they've been hiding under and file suit claiming they've been wronged by yet another deadbeat consumer.

Well,  they CAN but it is up to the Defendant to assert the defense that the creditor can't do that and possibly file a counter claim for the FDCPA violation if it applies.  You know very well that there are successful suits like this when the Defendant doesn't show or simply doesn't argue the SOL and the court deems it waived and the suit proceeds.

33 minutes ago, nascar said:

You should not be made to feel that you're somehow responsible for physician's inept record keeping and billing practices.

We don't know that the provider was inept or sloppy.  We do know the CA they hired IS however the provider may not even know that.  Many providers are clueless about this stuff too.

34 minutes ago, nascar said:

It may be your responsibility to pay a debt when you receive a timely invoice, but no way is it your responsibility to ensure the efficient operation of his office.

We also don't know that they didn't send a timely invoice either.  Like any other creditor they are only required to mail it not prove he received it.  We have bits and pieces of his convoluted story, an OP who clearly doesn't understand billing or EOBs/insurance and nothing from the provider or carrier on what their information is.  Yes, it is possible that what he is saying is 100% accurate but it is as much possible that he did receive at least ONE invoice and the EOB timely and didn't know what to do and then like a lot of patients/consumers ignored it and figured it would go away.  Now he wants a mortgage and suddenly it is extortion and everyone is out to get him and it must be deleted.  

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19 minutes ago, Clydesmom said:

That isn't exactly accurate.  Even though the SOL expired to sue the patient/OP for the debt it doesn't make the debt disappear.

You sound like a debt collector. Sue me and see how quickly the debt disappears.  ;)  

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CM, why do you make so many assumptions when talking with people in here?  I understand your "I will tell you the facts" bit, but at this point you are not telling anyone facts.  You're making assumptions.  Example,

4 minutes ago, Clydesmom said:

Legally the patient got the care and should pay for it but the provider/CA no longer as the courts to enforce it.

This is nothing more than an assumption.  You have ZERO way of knowing whether or not the OP "got the care", or if he is responsible in any way for paying the bill.  I say this because the OP tried to get info and was told that he could not appeal.  We have an issue here where NONE of us can say whether or not these charges are legitimate.  And knowing this, you still make these assumptions.

 

1 hour ago, Clydesmom said:

Because you first said the insurance company sent you a bill.  The carrier does not bill you for the care the provider the gave the care does.  Apparently a collection agency sent you a bill 14 months after the service and 2 months after your supposed right to dispute the bill.  You reached out to the insurance carrier and appealed which was denied.

Here is my educated guess as to what happened:

Collection agency billed you.  You appealed to the insurance carrier who still did not pay the bill as you anticipated.  When you didn't pay the provider or the collection agency it landed on your credit report.

I am trying to figure out where your confusion lies on this one.  Here's the OP's first post, telling us exactly what happened.

On 4/20/2016 at 2:06 PM, Juan Grande said:

Fast forward 14 months after the date of service...I get a bill from my insurance company stating I owed an additional $230 something and that if I felt the amount was incorrect and wanted to dispute it I could do so up to 12 months after the date of service. Essentially the dispute period had expired two months before I even received the letter. 

I reached out to the insurance company by mail and, as expected, they sent back some generic rejection letter and stated that I was still responsible for the bill.    

I wrote back again, appealing their decision, and they rejected my request again.

Since then the debt has been turned over to a collection agency who is of no help at all. 

See where he said, "Since then...."?  That means that the first communication at 14 months later came from the insurance company.  SINCE THEN, he has also heard from the debt collector.  I agree with you, it's weird that an insurance company would send a bill.  That in and of itself tells me that there's a fair chance that someone on the ins. end of this screwed up something.  It doesn't make sense that the ins. co. would send a bill, but he said that's what he got.  If he still had this paperwork, it might help to sort out what went wrong.   But no matter what, you do not need to make these assumptions when the OP told us clearly what took place and what he received from who.  Insurance company is required to send an EOB.  It doesnt look like OP ever got one in this case.

 

16 minutes ago, Clydesmom said:

We also don't know that they didn't send a timely invoice either.

You're right.  We don't know.  But you assumed anyways that this is a legit debt?  That does not compute.  For every point that you say, "it could be like _____", the fact is that it also could be just as he said it happened.  We do not have any info that would contradict what the OP has told us about this particular situation.  And until we do, we owe it to people that come here asking for help to not make baseless assumptions about them.

16 minutes ago, Clydesmom said:

We have bits and pieces of his convoluted story,

There's nothing convoluted about a timeline that you apparently missed in his post.

17 minutes ago, Clydesmom said:

an OP who clearly doesn't understand billing or EOBs/insurance and nothing from the provider or carrier on what their information is.

More assumptions?  The OP's level of understanding cannot be determined by you when you overlook things he did post and then claim that he was cryptic about those details.

18 minutes ago, Clydesmom said:

Yes, it is possible that what he is saying is 100% accurate but it is as much possible that he did receive at least ONE invoice and the EOB timely and didn't know what to do and then like a lot of patients/consumers ignored it and figured it would go away.  Now he wants a mortgage and suddenly it is extortion and everyone is out to get him and it must be deleted.  

CM, we are not talking about "a lot of patients".  We are talking about the OP.  That means it does not matter what "a lot of patients" would do, or have done.  It only matters what the OP has said, and what the OP has done.  You attacked him, based off assumptions that you have zero information to back up your assumptions about him.  This is not about "what is possible".  it's about what the OP brought to the table.  if we have a way of knowing that something the OP told us just cannot be true, then I would be in agreement with you.  But we don't.  And all that leaves us with is a guy you dont even know who came here asking for our help, and you attacking him with assumptions that you hold to just because "they are possible".

 

OP, the debt collector you mentioned has a history of reporting debts on credit reports, and then not updating them to show payments made.  They have a history of reporting debts and sending demands for payment while ignoring timely DV requests sent in writing.  I even found one report that they are not licensed as a debt collector.  Some states look more heavily upon that than others.  They are supposedly out of California.  California shows canceled licensing info for a business by that name that first opened up in the late 1970s.  I dont think that is the same company.  Might be a good idea to check if CA has a separate requirement for debt collectors to be licensed.  Another option you might have in gaining some leverage is if this CA is operating illegally and not following the laws. 

 

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2 minutes ago, kraftykrab said:

You have ZERO way of knowing whether or not the OP "got the care", or if he is responsible in any way for paying the bill.

Sure I do:  go back to his first post where he said he had lab work done and didn't understand why it wasn't covered.  Yes there are details missing but not that much.

I am not going to argue with you about the rest of it as it is pointless and beating a dead horse.

13 minutes ago, nascar said:

You sound like a debt collector.

Nope.  Not now never have been.  People like to say that A LOT when I don't tell them what they want to hear or play devil's advocate.  

13 minutes ago, nascar said:

Sue me and see how quickly the debt disappears. 

WHY would I sue you if you don't owe me any money?  That makes no sense what so ever.  However, if you did legitimately owe me money and didn't pay why would the debt disappear simply because I did sue you?  

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1 hour ago, Clydesmom said:

I agree if you can wait let it fall off.  However, if a mortgage is in the immediate future be prepared the underwriters may want it dealt with before doing the mortgage.  I would make certain before you house shop.  If the CA gets wind you want a mortgage the chances of them settling for less are ZERO don't give up your leverage.

That isn't exactly accurate.  Even though the SOL expired to sue the patient/OP for the debt it doesn't make the debt disappear.  The SOL expiring merely means that their legal remedies to collect are severely limited.  Legally the patient got the care and should pay for it but the provider/CA no longer as the courts to enforce it.   Not to mention there are two SOLs one for suing and one for reporting and because the one to sue expired does not mean they have to stop reporting.   In fact many will report and verify to the bitter end after the SOL for suing expires as that is their only weapon.

One more fact to consider that many providers are now resorting to due to patients not paying their bills:  they are refusing any more services until the past balances are paid or discharging the patient from care to seek another provider if they can find one.

Well,  they CAN but it is up to the Defendant to assert the defense that the creditor can't do that and possibly file a counter claim for the FDCPA violation if it applies.  You know very well that there are successful suits like this when the Defendant doesn't show or simply doesn't argue the SOL and the court deems it waived and the suit proceeds.

We don't know that the provider was inept or sloppy.  We do know the CA they hired IS however the provider may not even know that.  Many providers are clueless about this stuff too.

We also don't know that they didn't send a timely invoice either.  Like any other creditor they are only required to mail it not prove he received it.  We have bits and pieces of his convoluted story, an OP who clearly doesn't understand billing or EOBs/insurance and nothing from the provider or carrier on what their information is.  Yes, it is possible that what he is saying is 100% accurate but it is as much possible that he did receive at least ONE invoice and the EOB timely and didn't know what to do and then like a lot of patients/consumers ignored it and figured it would go away.  Now he wants a mortgage and suddenly it is extortion and everyone is out to get him and it must be deleted.  

I don't appreciate you calling my story "convoluted" and I'd ask that you start speaking more respectfully of me as I haven't shown no disrespect towards you. You sound like I'm trying to rip off your mother. I'm simply stating the FACTS and, no, I DID NOT receive any prior bills or EOB stating I owed money and why. I received one freaking bill 14 months after the date of service and since then nearly everyone involved, including you, have been nothing but extremely difficult and completely unhelpful. 

At no time did I mention I was getting a mortgage, only that I may try to buy a home soon, so why don't you learn how to read and deal with what was said instead of the story running through your head and the twisted narrative you clearly want to spew on all of us. Some people here are actually trying to help me so I'd appreciate it if you'd stay the hell out of the conversation unless you have some constructive help that is based upon facts and things I have actually said.  

I'm sure it would be a whole different story if this happened to you and there was zero recourse because the bill was sent to you so late that your rights to contest it had expired.

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13 minutes ago, Juan Grande said:

Some people here are actually trying to help me so I'd appreciate it if you'd stay the hell out of the conversation

I gave you four viable options.  Your issue is that no one will tell you what you want to hear:  that there is a guaranteed way to have this deleted.  

15 minutes ago, Juan Grande said:

 I DID NOT receive any prior bills or EOB stating I owed money and why.

14 minutes ago, Juan Grande said:

I'm sure it would be a whole different story if this happened to you and there was zero recourse because the bill was sent to you so late that your rights to contest it had expired.

If this had happened to me I wouldn't have waited 4 or more years to deal with it when I was thinking of getting a mortgage.

YOU need to go back and read.  What I said was the provider does not have to prove that you RECEIVED the bill only that they sent one.  Big difference.

16 minutes ago, Juan Grande said:

At no time did I mention I was getting a mortgage, only that I may try to buy a home soon, so why don't you learn how to read

The one who needs to learn how to read is you.  AGAIN:  what I said was if you are planning to get a mortgage you should have a plan in case the underwriters want this dealt with before approving the mortgage.  Once collectors find out you want that big loan they will poison your credit report in order to get money.  If this collector finds out you want one you lose your leverage for pay for delete.  HOW you handle it is your option.

I gave you 4 options.  Choose one.  Choose none I no longer care.   The tone of your posts tells me everything I need to know about you and you are beyond help if you aren't told what you want to hear.  Good luck you will need it.

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4 hours ago, Clydesmom said:

Sure I do:  go back to his first post where he said he had lab work done and didn't understand why it wasn't covered.  Yes there are details missing but not that much.

CM, 

Seriously, think about what you are saying.  Do you think that just because SOME services were actually performed, that no service providers ever bill for OTHER services?  Or that they never inflate the charges for those services?  Here I was, thinking that you knew what the medical billing industry is about and what happens way more often than it should, and yet you intentionally ignore ALL of these well known possibilities and assume(once again) that just because he had blood work done that all of the charges MUST be for said blood work.

Like I said, you are making assumptions that the info we have do not bear out.  And the sooner you stop doing that, the easier it will be for you to help people when they ask these questions.

4 hours ago, Clydesmom said:

I am not going to argue with you about the rest of it as it is pointless and beating a dead horse.

Therein lies the problem.  I did not ask for, or want you to, argue with me.  I am here for a DISCUSSION.  There is nothing pointless about the things I brought up, in fact, you said some of those same things yourself.  Why are they only pointless to you when someone else says them, but they are all intelligent fair game when you post them?

4 hours ago, Clydesmom said:

Nope.  Not now never have been.  People like to say that A LOT when I don't tell them what they want to hear or play devil's advocate.

You are talking about a well respected moderator on this board with that nonsense.  Said moderator is not the one who asked you for help, and is also not the one who is allowing themselves to get emotionally involved and insult others because they don't share her assumptions.  You are basing your position off of an assumed set of events that clearly did not even happen the way you thought it did.  

 

3 hours ago, Clydesmom said:

If this had happened to me I wouldn't have waited 4 or more years to deal with it when I was thinking of getting a mortgage.

Another assumption??  Please, show us in the original post where the OP stated WHEN the CA got involved and reported the debt to the credit report.  For all you know, this whole thing could have gone quiet, and the OP would have reason to think it might have just been left alone, until only recently.  Truth is, CM, you DONT know the things that you claim to know.  OP only wrote, "Since then, the debt has been turned over to a collection agency...."  So, you have no idea that the OP even could have known that this was still going on the whole time.  Stop guessing.  This has nothing to do with "you dont want to hear the truth", and everything to do with you being flat wrong on your assumptions but not willing to admit it.  

Now, can we get back to the topic at hand?  This guy came here to ask for help.  He did not come here to be insulted, lied about, belittled or whatever else you are intent on doing.  He asked for help.  He did not ask for you to wrongly assume you knew everything about what has happened.  If you do not wish to help him, that's fine.  But at least for the sake of the forum, stop ruining things for others who are trying to help, including the moderator I mentioned earlier.

3 hours ago, Clydesmom said:

I gave you four viable options.  Your issue is that no one will tell you what you want to hear:  that there is a guaranteed way to have this deleted.  

That's really funny.  Because I told him that there is no clear cut way to do that.  Others, like nascar, agreed with me saying that.  And yet, the only one that the OP is having issue with in this thread is you.  It's NOT because of "what he wants to hear".  If it were, then he would have taken issue with me when I told him this myself:

 

10 hours ago, kraftykrab said:

Well, there's no clear cut way to make sure it would be removed.  There are things you can try, but if the CA insists on reporting it, it will remain on your reports until the drop-off date.

And then, he would have taken issue with nascar, when nascar quoted me saying that and responded with this:

8 hours ago, nascar said:

So true. Even it was paid, a vindictive collector is liable to leave it on as paid collection just to kick more sand in your face.

But he didnt.  Strange how that worked, isnt it?  Perhaps you should go back, look at what really happened in this thread, and understand why he has an issue with the way you have treated him.  No one in here is blowing smoke up his back side or trying to tell him "what he wants to hear".  But the rest of us are also trying to help him, not insult him.  Maybe that's got something to do with it?  

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6 hours ago, kraftykrab said:

... understand why he has an issue with the way you have treated him.

Understood. The tone of discourse in this thread has become unacceptable. Please, lets all be considerate of others in our comments/responses. If anyone truly has something to contribute, we need be able do so without the ad hominem.

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Thanks @kraftykrab and @nascar for trying to help. It's too bad our conversation was hijacked by this bizarre person who chooses to insult and slander people for no apparent reason and offer little to no help. 

You are correct @kraftykrab I did try to handle this issue when I first received the bill and wrote several appeal letters to the insurance company but no one, and I mean NO ONE, was helpful at all. Exasperated, defeated and frustrated I gave up and, just like now, am resigned to let this run its course and fall off in 10/2017 since it seems there's nothing else I can do. If forced to I will pay it off before then but it's the principle of this whole thing. It's wrong and I feel like I'm being extorted.   

@willingtocope maybe you should consider banning contributors (if you can call it that) like @Clydesmom since this person clearly has a pattern of antagonistic, confrontational behavior on these forums and doesn't seem to offer much in the way of help. I came here for help and this person insulted and essentially called me a liar, beyond that all they did was waste people's time and argue. 

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@Juan Grande  I have had very good results dealing with minor medical collections like this by doing 2 simple steps.  #1 Dispute it with the CRAs.  Make this a simple, short dispute. Don't get wordy or start citing federal statutes or anything.  If the CRA responds saying they "verified" or "updated" - or any other way that does not remove the collection account, then I will follow that with another letter to the CRA called a MOV. This will ask the CRA to provide to you the method used to verify AND for the name, address and phone number of the person who verified the account to them.

I find that the CRAs generally respond to the MOV with a generic form letter (and don't actually provide the contact info requested), but if you check your reports again a week or 2 later you may just find that they quietly removed the account in question anyway.  This has worked for me almost every time on these types of collection TLs.

Now, just to be clear, it is possible that this account can later be re-added to your credit reports.  Out of the dozen or so times I have gotten an account removed using the MOV method, one of them (an alleged medical debt for just under $500) was owned by a scum collection attorney with 4 different shell companies under him.  About 2 months after removal, he reported it again to my reports under one of his other company names.  I did the MOV method again, and 2 months later he reported it again under yet another company name.  We did this 4 times until he ran out of shell companies to report this as and I haven't see it again since.

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