Brotherskeeper

Judge Posner (ret.) to Help Pro Se Litigants

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Wow. From the Affidavit of Richard A. Posner, Esq.,  recently retired after more than 35 years as an Article III judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, including a seven-year term as the court’s chief judge: 

https://www.scribd.com/document/361959492/Motion-for-Richard-A-Posner-to-be-Designated-as-Advisory-Counsel-in-CA-4-case-No-17-1955
"6. I have decided to dedicate my post-judicial career to helping pro se  litigants."

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On 10/20/2017 at 11:18 AM, Brotherskeeper said:
 

Wow. From the Affidavit of Richard A. Posner, Esq.,  recently retired after more than 35 years as an Article III judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, including a seven-year term as the court’s chief judge: 

https://www.scribd.com/document/361959492/Motion-for-Richard-A-Posner-to-be-Designated-as-Advisory-Counsel-in-CA-4-case-No-17-1955
"6. I have decided to dedicate my post-judicial career to helping pro se  litigants."

Judge Posner was often mentioned as a nominee for  US Surpreme Court.  He is a brilliant legal scholar.

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@debtzapper Doesn't suffer fools gladly, either. 

"And I’m not taking senior status; my departure is total. It has to do with fact that I don’t think the court is treating the pro se appellants fairly, and none of the other judges agrees with me (or rather, they don’t like the pro se’s and don’t want to do anything with them, with occasional exceptions only).

[Judge Posner] intended to stay on the Chicago-based 7th Circuit until he turned 80… but “difficulty” with his colleague… moved up that date.

“I was not getting along with the other judges because I was (and am) very concerned about how the court treats pro se litigants, who I believe deserve a better shake,” Posner wrote.

About 55 percent to 60 percent of the litigants who file appeals with the 7th Circuit represent themselves without lawyers. Very few pro se litigants are provided the opportunity to argue their cases in court. The 7th Circuit rules on most of those cases based on the briefs."

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