Gasman4571

Employer took money from paycheck in Va.

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Here is the backstory....

I work for an auto dealership (who wont be named).

I had a customer come in on 1/18/2018 with $500 worth of coupons from a manufacturer as a gift for customer retention. The customer had looked on the manufacturer's website and had found some items that they wanted to use the coupons for. Two of the coupons were due to expire on 1/20/2018. I took the order from the customer and was in the process of in-putting their order, when my immediate manager came in and told me that I needed to leave the premises, that I was suspended for 1 week without pay, and not to return until 1/26/2018. The reason for that is a whole other story. So, I left the order incomplete.

During my "vacation", The manager finally decided to put the order in on 1/23/2018, after the customer continued to call to check on the order. He had no idea how to do it and had to text me at home to get the instructions from me. When I came back to work on the 26th, the parts had arrived, but now there was a $200 shortage because the two coupons had expired. Needless to say, I held onto the parts because there was a appeal process that involved our District Manager, who could approve the expired coupons to be redeemed, if certain guidelines were followed. My manager told me to continue lying to the customer that his parts weren't there yet, due to a printing issue..of course pending the outcome of the appeal.

The District Manager denied the appeal because the order had been placed 3 days after the coupons expired. (please note, I wasn't there) The process took 2 weeks. During this time the customer is being lied to by me....and I didn't appreciate being put in that position.

My manager wanted me to call the customer and ask them for the remaining $200 shortfall in their bill! And I wasn't even here! I called the District Manager and asked for advice, the response was to stop lying to the customer and give them what they had ordered. She agreed that I shouldn't be held responsible for the $200, because I wasn't involved in the transaction.

I called the customer in mid-February for them to pick up their items. I invoiced them and sent them on their way. The Comptroller held the invoice open until the end of March, because there was a dispute on who was going to pay the missing $200. I stood my ground and refused to be responsible for it. Instead, the Comptroller decided I WOULD be responsible and began deducting $100 from my paychecks without my written consent.

I really don't want to make waves....but this is MY money that I worked for and earned. Nor do I want my job in jeopardy over $200 either.

What I did manage to find was this.....download.pdfdownload.pdf

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I think this is the wrong forum for this issue.

You would need to talk to someone in employment law.

There was one time, decades ago, when I was getting screwed over by an employer.  A lawyer told me I could fight it and probably win, but at the cost of my job.  So I let it lie.  

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The dealership is the one who made the mistake.  They should have left you out of it.  Instead of being honest with the customer, and taking the chance of losing the sale, they let you take the hit for it. 

Is this unfair?  Absolutely!  Unfortunately, if you decided to fight this, you can kiss your job goodbye.

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3 hours ago, Gasman4571 said:

this is MY money that I worked for and earned. Nor do I want my job in jeopardy over $200 either.

You can't have it both ways, unfortunately. 

Just curious why you would want to hold on to a job that forces you to lie to your customers, and then throws you under the bus when sh!t predictably goes sideways. If you take this lying down, you the only thing you can know for sure is they will do it again the next time they need a scapegoat. 

I don't know if this would help you decide, but a lot of times employers are liable for treble damages (3x the unpaid amount) and legal fees. An employment lawyer would certainly be able to tell you for sure, and since they would be getting their fees from the employer, would probably take the case on contingency.

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1 hour ago, Harry Seaward said:

You can't have it both ways, unfortunately. 

Just curious why you would want to hold on to a job that forces you to lie to your customers, and then throws you under the bus when sh!t predictably goes sideways. If you take this lying down, you the only thing you can know for sure is they will do it again the next time they need a scapegoat. 

I don't know if this would help you decide, but a lot of times employers are liable for treble damages (3x the unpaid amount) and legal fees. An employment lawyer would certainly be able to tell you for sure, and since they would be getting their fees from the employer, would probably take the case on contingency.

Um, yeah, but sorry to say, if someone sues an employer, that person is sometimes blackballed.

I went through some amazing **** at a previous job, stuff that was completely unfair to the point where the attorney for the head office was giving the local HR people tips on how to convince me not to sue.  At the same time, their attorney was dealing with a case where a really big name in the company sued them, and they fought it.  The attorney basically said he did NOT want to deal with my case, because it was so much stronger.  

So I spent a few more years at the company until they closed down the local plant.  

Now they give me excellent references.  There is no way I could've gotten my current job had I sued my previous employer.  It could NOT have happened,

 

However, if you are planning to leave this company anyway, and if you don't give a rat's patootie about references (it seems they don't like you anyway), then go ahead and sue, preferably as soon as you find another job.  

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BackFromTheDebt is right.  If you pursued this, depending upon your position, you could be blackballed from dealerships, parts counters, and independent shops in your area. 

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4 minutes ago, BackFromTheDebt said:

Um, yeah, but sorry to say, if someone sues an employer, that person is sometimes blackballed.

Blackballed from working at another crappy employer? Sign me up.  (No decent employer participates in the practice of blackballing, is my point.)

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The way to avoid blackballing is to apply for a job at a new employer and then sue the old employer once you leave. If the give a bad reference to try to keep you from leaving, then they will blackball you anyways and you should just sue them. Personally, I would be trying to get out of that place as quick as possible, regardless of whether I was going to sue them or not. You can be sure if they screwed you over once, they will do it again.

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I would seek a consultation with an employment lawyer. Find out if there is a statute of limitations, and then if you ever went to a new place sue them (within the limitations period). 

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On 4/11/2018 at 1:30 PM, Harry Seaward said:

Blackballed from working at another crappy employer? Sign me up.  (No decent employer participates in the practice of blackballing, is my point.)

Unfortunately, sometimes the choices are either a crappy employer or NO employer.  I've been in the dilemma myself, and it is no fun.  However, millions of Americans are in that position.  

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On 4/14/2018 at 2:39 PM, BackFromTheDebt said:

Unfortunately, sometimes the choices are either a crappy employer or NO employer.

Only when a person refuses to think outside the box and adjust their lifestyle accordingly. The alternatives might sting the pride for a few months, but the choices are almost never limited to unlawful employer and no employer. 

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