Credit Infocenter

How Credit Bureaus Describe Dispute Process (Part 1 of 3): TransUnion

December 7th, 2016 · No Comments · Credit Repair

by Kristy Welsh

(Last Updated On: August 17, 2017)

Though the law is the same for all three major credit reporting bureaus, it’s interesting to see how each of them describe their credit dispute process. Your rights are the same whether you’re disputing with TransUnion, Experian, or Equifax, but each of them explains the dispute process in a slightly different way. This three-part series breaks down what each of them have to say about it, starting with TransUnion.

Though the law is the same for all three major credit reporting agencies, it’s interesting to see how each of them describe their credit dispute process. Your rights are the same whether you’re disputing with TransUnion, Experian, or Equifax, but each of them explains the dispute process in a slightly different way. This three-part series breaks down what each of them have to say about it, starting with TransUnion. Because the more you know about how it works, the more you’ll successful you’ll be with the credit repair process.

1) TransUnion makes it very clear they prefer you to dispute online.

Don’t do it. Most experts agree you should only send credit disputes via regular mail. Specifically, send them certified mail with return receipt requested.

2) When they forward your credit dispute to data furnishers, TransUnion says they instruct them to:

  • Review your dispute
  • Verify the accuracy of the information they are reporting
  • Provide a response to your dispute
  • Update their records, as necessary

3) Give it time.

TransUnion says they complete most investigations within 30 days, but says it could take up to 45 days to complete the process.

4) If you file online, you’ll receive your response online.

Again, we do not recommend this route, but if you were to file online, TransUnion says you would receive an email notifying you once the investigation is complete. This will allow you to see how your credit report was (or wasn’t) changed in response to your dispute.

5) If you file through the mail (or by phone), your response will come through the mail.

This will be a summary of the investigation, letting you know how it turned out. TransUnion says to allow up to a week for the receipt of this summary after the investigation is complete.

6) You have options if you’re not happy with the result.

If your dispute is not resolved, you can submit to TransUnion a 100-word statement that will be added to your credit report. This is a chance for you to tell potential creditors your side of the story.

TransUnion also notes that you can request documentation or written verification regarding your account directly through the data furnishers, and that you can request from TransUnion an explanation of how they conducted their investigation.

Beyond that, TransUnion notes that you can submit a complaint to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). What they don’t make clear is the importance of first filing a credit dispute directly with the data furnisher. It’s important to exhaust every other possibility for resolution before involving the CFPB.

Mailing Your Credit Dispute to TransUnion

Mail your dispute (with supporting documents) to:

TransUnion, LLC
Consumer Dispute Center
P.O. Box 2000
Chester, PA 19016

By the way, you need not start your dispute letter from scratch. Simply edit our sample dispute letter to request removal of inaccurate information from your credit report.

Need to Deal With the Other Credit Bureaus, Too?

Here’s what Experian and Equifax have to say about the dispute process.

Tags:

No Comments so far ↓

There are no comments yet...Kick things off by filling out the form below.

Leave a Comment